bluehead

(redirected from blueheads)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

bluehead

(ˈbluːˌhɛd)
n
either of two fish of the wrasse family, Thalassoma amblycephalum or Thalassoma bifasciatum
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bluehead - small Atlantic wrasse the male of which has a brilliant blue head
wrasse - chiefly tropical marine fishes with fleshy lips and powerful teeth; usually brightly colored
genus Thalassoma, Thalassoma - a genus of Labridae
References in periodicals archive ?
Our blueheads, and-yellow garden, the brick garden, becomes a brown-and-brown garden during the winter months but it is saved from descent into depression by a series of seedheads.
Blueheads are shortlived sex-changing members of the family Labridae.
Natural recruitment in blueheads occurs in pulses, a pattern common for many reef fishes (Williams 1983, MacFarland et al.
Mortality rates for these slightly older fish were similar to those found for comparably aged bluehead wrasse in other areas of the Caribbean.
Spawning and recruitment of the bluehead wrasse Thalassoma bifasciatum in Barbados, West Indies.
Of these fishes, four are listed federally as endangered under the Endangered Species Act and three, including the bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus) are now restricted to ca.
The bluehead sucker historically occurred in the Upper Snake, Weber, and Bear river drainages (Sigler and Miller, 1963; Sublette et al.
As with many imperiled riverine fishes, factors that threaten bluehead suckers include dams and diversions, degradation of habitat, and introduction of nonnative fishes.
Often working in combination with effects of dams and diversions, degradation of instream habitat represents a substantial threat to bluehead suckers.
In addition to combined effects of dams and diversions and instream degradation of habitat, introduced species of fish threaten bluehead suckers through predation, competition, and hybridization (N.
The bluehead sucker in the Weber River is a unique and understudied fish.
Working toward the goal of providing necessary information to guide conservation and management of bluehead suckers in the Weber River and other systems, we completed an extensive study of two populations in the Weber River, northern Utah.