bluesnarfing


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Related to bluesnarfing: Bluebugging

bluesnarfing

(ˈbluːˌsnɑːfɪŋ)
n
(Communications & Information) the practice of using one Bluetooth-enabled mobile phone to steal contact details, ring tones, images, etc from another
[C21: from Blue(tooth) + snarf]
References in periodicals archive ?
Data theft can be categorized as: Hacking, Rootkit or backdoor, Thumbsucking (copying confidential data using thumb devices), Posing (aggregation of users' information from cookies), Podslurping (data stealing using iPods), Bluesnarfing (stealing data using Bluetooth devices), and Spyware (gathers personal or system specific information without user notification and sends to spyware creators) [1,6,12,18].
This concept has adopted the name 'Bluesnarfing' and on certain mobile phones it will give access to contact lists, text messages, emails and a calendar via a Bluetooth connection.
Businesses at risk from 'Podslurping' or 'Bluesnarfing' should now be on the look out for 'Camsnuffling', according to Birmingham IT firm Icomm Technologies.
One technique, known as 'Bluesnarfing', actually activates Bluetooth in devices, allowing the reading or modification of address books and calendars.
Bluesnarfing. Adam Laurie, a network security expert who is chief security officer of The Bunker, a secure colocation facility in the U.K., discovered flaws in Bluetooth that allowed several types of attacks, including one he has dubbed "bluesnarfing" ("snarfing" is techie jargon meaning to taking unauthorized copies of information).
They termed the trick "Bluesnarfing." When presented with AL Digital's evidence, major cell phone makers, including Nokia and Ericsson, said they were not aware of any such attacks taking place.
The vulnerability, which also affected some Sony Ericsson mobile phones, put the models at risk of so-called "bluesnarfing", in which an attacker can access and modify a phone's address book and calendar, reports ZDNet UK.
'Bluesnarfing', as the scam is called, involves somebody stealing personal information, such as phone numbers or phone lock codes, from your mobile.
Hackers can download confidential phone numbers, diary entries and even photos from up to 87 yards away using a technique called Bluesnarfing.
Adam Laurie, who runs a computer security company, said he has written software allowing him to download information from phones equipped with the latest Bluetooth technology in a technique known as Bluesnarfing.
* BlueSnarfing attacks where the hacker gains access to phonebook and calendar information and can divert calls to their own phone