blurbist

blurbist

(ˈblɜːbɪst)
n
a person who writes blurbs
References in periodicals archive ?
When I see "laugh-out-loud funny" on the back of a book, I wonder whether the blurbist is secretly telling me not to buy the supposed laugh riot.
Even this book's blurbist calls him |the notorious Scottish Reformer' although to its author he is prophet, patriarch, and |the Ezekiel of Scotland'.
Another blurbist, Sander Vanocur, says--with exquisite evenhandedness--"Since 1959, Fidel Castro has played the Antichrist for the United States, and vice versa." I would say that Castro has "played the Antichrist" chiefly for the Cubans he has either jailed, tortured, killed, exiled, or immiserated, which, all told, is pretty much everyone.
This is war, alter all, as their blurbist and the master-figure of the Clinton era, James Carville, has defined it.
Perhaps it was Warnock's headmistressy authorial voice that caused her blurbist to tell us that she explains how to distinguish right from wrong "in no uncertain terms." Indeed all her later writings display a confidence bordering on condescension.
(To be sure, it is a confusion shared by many American observers, too, such as the left-leaning dust-jacket blurbists for Jones's book, Eric Foner and Sean Wilentz.)
His virulence against professional glad-handing was only a matter of dynamiting fish in a barrel, as any cheap joke about logrolling blurbists has by now more than demonstrated.
As two of his blurbists point out, Goldstein has written a "polemic," and polemics are good at rallying the faithful, not converting the heathen.
But something keeps him on the hysterical playground--it may just be a conspiracy of blurbists and critics.
(The book jacket makes the point obvious: blurbists include George Stephanopoulos and Jay Leno.)
Many years later, I began to devise the yarn that eventually became Haroun and the Sea of Stories, and felt strongly that if I could strike the right note it should be possible to write the tale in such a way as to make it of interest to adults as well as children: or, to use the phrase beloved of blurbists, to `children from seven to seventy'" (18).
Nevertheless, close critical attention-beyond the reach of blurbists and reviewers--is indispensable to full reception of any significant body of work.