boarder

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boarder

one who pays a stipulated amount for meals and lodging: My boarder will be leaving at the end of the month.
Not to be confused with:
border – the part of an area that forms its outer boundary; the line that separates one area, state, or country from another; periphery: They are building a fence along the border.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

board·er

 (bôr′dər)
n.
1. One who boards, especially:
a. One who pays a stipulated sum in return for regular meals or for meals and lodging.
b. One who goes on board a vessel as part of an assault or military action.
2. A person who rides a board, such as a snowboard or surfboard, as a sport.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

boarder

(ˈbɔːdə)
n
1. (Education) Brit a pupil who lives at school during term time
2. (Education) US a child who lives away from its parents and is cared for by a person or organization receiving payment
3. another word for lodger
4. (Nautical Terms) a person who boards a ship, esp one who forces his way aboard in an attack: stand by to repel boarders.
5. (Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) informal a person who takes part in sailboarding or snowboarding
6. (Skiing) informal a person who takes part in sailboarding or snowboarding
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

board•er

(ˈbɔr dər, ˈboʊr-)

n.
a person, esp. a lodger, who is supplied with regular meals.
[1520–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boarder - a tenant in someone's houseboarder - a tenant in someone's house    
renter, tenant - someone who pays rent to use land or a building or a car that is owned by someone else; "the landlord can evict a tenant who doesn't pay the rent"
2.boarder - someone who forces their way aboard ship; "stand by to repel boarders"
interloper, intruder, trespasser - someone who intrudes on the privacy or property of another without permission
3.boarder - a pupil who lives at school during term time
school-age child, schoolchild, pupil - a young person attending school (up through senior high school)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
internátní žákstrávník
kostskoleelevpensionær
sisäoppilaitoksen oppilas
učenik u internatu
bennlakólakó
寄宿生
기숙생
stravník
gost v penzionuinternatski gojenec
inackordering
เด็กประจำ
học sinh nội trú

boarder

[ˈbɔːdəʳ] N (in house) → huésped(a) m/f (Brit) (Scol) → interno/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

boarder

[ˈbɔːrr] n
(= lodger) → pensionnaire mf
(at school)interne mf, pensionnaire mfboard game njeu m de plateau
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

boarder

n
Pensionsgast m; to take in boardersLeute in Pension nehmen
(Sch) → Internatsschüler(in) m(f); (= weekly boarder) während der Woche im Internat wohnender Schüler (dated, = day boarder) Tagesschüler, der in der Schule zu Mittag isst
(Naut) → Mitglied nteines Enterkommandos
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

boarder

[ˈbɔːdəʳ] npensionante m/f (Scol) → collegiale m/f, convittore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

board

(boːd) noun
1. a strip of timber. The floorboards of the old house were rotten.
2. a flat piece of wood etc for a special purpose. notice-board; chessboard.
3. meals. board and lodging.
4. an official group of persons administering an organization etc. the board of directors.
verb
1. to enter, or get on to (a vehicle, ship, plane etc). This is where we board the bus.
2. to live temporarily and take meals (in someone else's house). He boards at Mrs Smith's during the week.
ˈboarder noun
a person who temporarily lives, and takes his meals, in someone else's house.
ˈboarding-house noun
a house where people live and take meals as paying guests.
ˈboarding-school noun
a school which provides accommodation and food as well as instruction.
across the board adjective (etc) applying in all cases: They were awarded wage increases across the board; ()
an across-the-board increase.
go by the board
to be abandoned. All my plans went by the board when I lost my job.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

boarder

تَلْمِيذ دَاخِلِيّ internátní žák kostskoleelev Internatsschüler οικότροφος huésped, interno sisäoppilaitoksen oppilas pensionnaire učenik u internatu pensionante 寄宿生 기숙생 kostganger pensjonatgjest (stołujący się) lokator aluno interno пансионер inackordering เด็กประจำ yatılı học sinh nội trú 寄宿生
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
'Who's there?' screamed a numerous chorus of treble voices from the staircase inside, consisting of the spinster lady of the establishment, three teachers, five female servants, and thirty boarders, all half-dressed and in a forest of curl-papers.
A group of boarders were seated on the high stoop upon round, flat mats like German pancakes.
apparently, by the boarders, where the table-cloths were red-and-white-checkered, and the population, who seemed to have known one another intimately for years, rose up at midnight to make Welsh rare-bits if it felt hungry.
And one of our boarders has suffered much from the vengeance and persecution of the cardinal!"
There were ten or a dozen boarders there; but they were honest foremen or commonplace clerks from the stores, of a very different calibre from the young Irishman.
They're so big that people living in them have to take boarders just to fill up.
The bar-room was now full of the boarders who had been dropping in the night previous, and whom I had not as yet had a good look at.
There would be an average of half a dozen boarders to each room--sometimes there were thirteen or fourteen to one room, fifty or sixty to a flat.
"The pincher," was his thought; "too miserly to burn two cents' worth of gas and save his boarders' necks."
`I suppose that you can get rid of your boarders when you wish.'
But his words were unheeded, no shot was fired, and the last boarder made good his escape and disappeared with the rest into the wood.
"But a boarder at fifteen francs is always interesting."