boar

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Related to Boars: Boers

boar

 (bôr)
n.
1. The wild boar.
2.
a. An uncastrated male pig.
b. The adult male of any of several mammals, such as a badger, raccoon, or guinea pig.

[Middle English bor, from Old English bār.]

boar

(bɔː)
n
1. (Animals) an uncastrated male pig
2. (Animals) See wild boar
[Old English bār; related to Old High German bēr]

boar

(bɔr, boʊr)

n.
1. an uncastrated male swine.
[before 1000; Middle English boor, Old English bār; c. Middle Dutch beer, Old High German bêr]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boar - Old World wild swine having a narrow body and prominent tusks from which most domestic swine comeboar - Old World wild swine having a narrow body and prominent tusks from which most domestic swine come; introduced in United States
tusk - a long pointed tooth specialized for fighting or digging; especially in an elephant or walrus or hog
swine - stout-bodied short-legged omnivorous animals
genus Sus, Sus - type genus of the Suidae
2.boar - an uncastrated male hog
swine - stout-bodied short-legged omnivorous animals

boar

noun
Related words
collective noun sounder
Translations
خَنْزيرٌ ذَكَر
verro
divočákkanec
vildsvinvildsvineorne
metssiga
karjuvillisika
vepar
vaddisznóvadkan
gölturvilligölturvillisvín
kuilysšernas
kuilisvepris
dzikknur
diviak
merjasec
galtvildsvin
erkek domuzyaban domuzu

boar

[bɔːʳ] N (= male pig) → cerdo m, verraco m
wild boarjabalí m

boar

[ˈbɔːr] nsanglier m

boar

n (= male pig)Eber m; (wild) → Keiler m; boar’s headSchweinskopf m

boar

[bɔːʳ] n (male pig) → verro; (wild boar) → cinghiale m

boar

(boː) noun
a male pig (especially the wild variety).
References in classic literature ?
The duchess dismounted, and with a sharp boar-spear in her hand posted herself where she knew the wild boars were in the habit of passing.
As the huntress Diana goes forth upon the mountains of Taygetus or Erymanthus to hunt wild boars or deer, and the wood nymphs, daughters of Aegis-bearing Jove, take their sport along with her (then is Leto proud at seeing her daughter stand a full head taller than the others, and eclipse the loveliest amid a whole bevy of beauties), even so did the girl outshine her handmaids.
When they came to the part where the bravest and most in number were gathered about mighty Diomed, fighting like lions or wild boars of great strength and endurance, there Juno stood still and raised a shout like that of brazen-voiced Stentor, whose cry was as loud as that of fifty men together.
You remember having related to me the story of the Roman general Antony, who had always seven wild boars kept roasting, each cooked up to a different point; so that he might be able to have his dinner at any time of the day he chose to ask for it.
The best view in the world in my opinion is that from Boars Hill on a fine day-- it must be a fine day, mark you--A rug?
And yet here, real as life, wild boars dashed through my dreams, and I, with fantastic parents, swung through the lofty tree-spaces.
168-177) Also there were upon the shield droves of boars and lions who glared at each other, being furious and eager: the rows of them moved on together, and neither side trembled but both bristled up their manes.
When he blew this bugle, four-and-twenty other gentlemen of inferior rank, in Lincoln green a little coarser, and russet boots with a little thicker soles, turned out directly: and away galloped the whole train, with spears in their hands like lacquered area railings, to hunt down the boars, or perhaps encounter a bear: in which latter case the baron killed him first, and greased his whiskers with him afterwards.
The common hog has also run wild on one islet; all are of a black colour: the boars are very fierce, and have great trunks.
To our enthusiasm for Thomas she added a personal bitterness against the Wild Boars, as she persisted in calling them, each time as though it were the first.
And that was a day of romance; If those robber-barons were somewhat grim and drunken ogres, they had a certain grandeur of the wild beast in them,--they were forest boars with tusks, tearing and rending, not the ordinary domestic grunter; they represented the demon forces forever in collision with beauty, virtue, and the gentle uses of life; they made a fine contrast in the picture with the wandering minstrel, the soft-lipped princess, the pious recluse, and the timid Israelite.
Barnard, to which the Blue Boar in our town was a mere public-house.