bodice

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bod·ice

 (bŏd′ĭs)
n.
1. The fitted part of a dress that extends from the waist to the shoulder.
2. A woman's laced outer garment, worn like a vest over a blouse.
3. Obsolete A corset.

[Alteration of bodies, pl. of body.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bodice

(ˈbɒdɪs)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) the upper part of a woman's dress, from the shoulder to the waist
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a tight-fitting corset worn laced over a blouse, as in certain national costumes, or (formerly) as a woman's undergarment
[C16: originally Scottish bodies, plural of body]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bod•ice

(ˈbɒd ɪs)

n.
1. the part of a woman's dress covering the body above the waistline.
2. a woman's cross-laced, sleeveless outer garment covering the waist and bust, common in peasant dress.
3. Obs. stays or a corset.
[1560–70; bodies, pl. of body]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bodice - part of a dress above the waistbodice - part of a dress above the waist  
dress, frock - a one-piece garment for a woman; has skirt and bodice
plastron - the ornamental front of a woman's bodice or shirt
top - a garment (especially for women) that extends from the shoulders to the waist or hips; "he stared as she buttoned her top"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
صَدْرُ فُسْتان
živůtek
overdel
upphlutur
liemenėviršutinė suknelės dalis
ņieburs
živôtik
korsajkorse

bodice

[ˈbɒdɪs] N [of dress] → canesú m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bodice

[ˈbɒdɪs] ncorsage m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bodice

n
Mieder nt; (of dress also)Oberteil nt
(= vest)Leibchen nt

bodice

:
bodice ripper
bodice-ripping
adj attr (inf) bodice film/novelschwülstiger historischer Film/Roman
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bodice

[ˈbɒdɪs] n (of dress) → corpino, corpetto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

bodice

(ˈbodis) noun
the upper part of a woman's or child's dress. The dress had an embroidered bodice.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Now this was written at a time when the black limber bone of the Greenland or Right whale was largely used in ladies' bodices. But this same bone is not in the tail; it is in the head, which is a sad mistake for a sagacious lawyer like Prynne.
There were milkmaids and shepherdesses, with brightly colored bodices and golden spots all over their gowns; and princesses with most gorgeous frocks of silver and gold and purple; and shepherds dressed in knee breeches with pink and yellow and blue stripes down them, and golden buckles on their shoes; and princes with jeweled crowns upon their heads, wearing ermine robes and satin doublets; and funny clowns in ruffled gowns, with round red spots upon their cheeks and tall, pointed caps.
But let the elder be passed over here for those under whose bodices the life throbbed quick and warm.
Percerin being saved, made, out of gratitude, some beautiful black bodices, very inexpensively indeed, for Queen Catherine, who ended by being pleased at the preservation of a Huguenot people, on whom she had long looked with detestation.
I had only time, in dressing, to glance at the solid furniture, the framed pieces of work (done, I supposed, by Steerforth's mother when she was a girl), and some pictures in crayons of ladies with powdered hair and bodices, coming and going on the walls, as the newly-kindled fire crackled and sputtered, when I was called to dinner.
She wore a blue and white-striped vest, with long open sleeves, trimmed with silver loops and buttons of pearls, and a sort of bodice, which, closing only from the centre to the waist, exhibited the whole of the ivory throat and upper part of the bosom; it was fastened with three magnificent diamond clasps.
This black-eyed, wide-mouthed girl, not pretty but full of life- with childish bare shoulders which after her run heaved and shook her bodice, with black curls tossed backward, thin bare arms, little legs in lace-frilled drawers, and feet in low slippers- was just at that charming age when a girl is no longer a child, though the child is not yet a young woman.
Never were hands more exquisite than hers, and it was a joy to look at them when she threaded her needle or adjusted her gold thimble to her taper middle finger as she sewed away on the little night-drawers or fashioned a bodice or a bib.
But she -- the naughty baggage -- little will she care what they put upon the bodice of her gown Why, look you, she may cover it with a brooch, or such like.
She put on a black skirt, but chose the bodice of the evening dress which she liked best: it was of a white damask which was fashionable in those days.
"Well, bonne chance!" she added, giving Vronsky one finger of the hand in which she held her fan, and with a shrug of her shoulders she twitched down the bodice of her gown that had worked up, so as to be duly naked as she moved forward towards the footlights into the light of the gas, and the sight of all eyes.
Yet Eurylochus fancied that one of them had sea-green hair, and that the close-fitting bodice of a second looked like the bark of a tree, and that both the others had something odd in their aspect, although he could not quite determine what it was, in the little while that he had to examine them.