body clock

(redirected from body clocks)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to body clocks: Biological clocks

body clock

n.
A physiological mechanism that is thought to regulate physical and mental functions in chronological rhythm.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
He discovered that in the animals' whose body clocks were sent haywire, the pattern vanished, and sugar posed a problem day and night, the Daily Mail reported.
It's not teenagers' faults if they are grumpy, it's just that their body clocks are out of whack.
The Welsh players will have to cope with searing temperatures, a gruelling 13-hour round trip and a four-hour time difference which will throw their body clocks.
A We are nine hours behind Sydney so your body clocks will be totally thrown out of sync.
This research has many implications because it extends our knowledge of how the environment influences body clocks."
ALL the hype about the players' body clocks being tuned in to a 3pm kick-off, so that the game was played simultaneously with the first half of the England/Italy game, seemed to be just that - hype.
According to scientists who have studied the way our body clocks work, the cause of this seasonal problem may be a tiny, egg-shaped body located in the brain.
A subset of the study participants were also given portable blue-light light boxes to place at their workstations to help reset their internal body clocks and improve their performance.
Because our body clocks are so finely tuned, the regular patterns they produce - known as circadian rhythms - can be disrupted by our 24-hour lifestyles, producing jetlag-type symptoms.
They were tested on 16 healthy volunteers who were put into isolation chambers where their body clocks could be disrupted.
Washington, July 13 (ANI): Research has earlier shown that light is the key to getting our 'body clocks' back in sync, and now a new study by researchers from Queen Mary, University of London, who explored the resynchronisation mechanism in insects, have discovered a molecule essential to the process.
People whose body clocks are out of sync, like shiftworkers, are at greater risk of several diseases of advancing age such as heart disease and cancer.