bogong


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bogong

(ˈbəʊˌɡɒŋ) or

bugong

n
(Animals) an edible dark-coloured Australian noctuid moth, Agrotis infusa
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References in periodicals archive ?
CSIRO's Australian National Insect Collection will help identify native species of insects that are potential candidates for the edible insect industry in Australia, and work with local Aboriginal communities to understand traditions around witjuti grubs, bogong moths and green tree ants, which are known for their zesty citrus-tasting abdomens.
For dessert, the sugary stems of the Bogong Daisy-bush Olearia frostii can be chewed.
Warrant and Lund researcher David Dreyer--together with colleagues from Australia, Canada, Germany, and the U.S.--studied the moth species Agrotis infusa, also known as the Bogong moth, in Australia.
They run down from Feathertop, Townsend and Bogong. (108) They run through the Ash and the Pine of Tumbarumba [long musical pause].
John Blay, the author, with the help of others spent years rediscovering the route along which Indigenous Australians attended Bogong moth ceremonies in the high country and whale gatherings at Twofold Bay.
Patterns of air temperature and accumulation of snow in subalpine heathlands and grasslands on the Bogong High Plains, Victoria.
(40.) Zhu, "Du Zihou 'Buyue' shi shi wen Lu Bogong fu hou shuri fu ci".
The Wiradjuri people of the New South Wales highlands once feasted on migrating bogong moths every spring.
The detail and interest in this book just gets better and better as you delve into the world of bush tucker bugs, sweet bush foods, edible bugs and grubs, nutritional analysis of caterpillars, feasting on bogong moths, tasty hoppers, locusts and crickets.
However, Thompson's source is not Lingard 1846 but a misinterpreted passage attributed to Lingard 1846 in 'Mallacoota Memories', a Mallacoota and District Historical Society publication (1980:23) (1) which reads, 'The Genore River was followed by the Biduelli tribe--"scrub dwellers" = on their annual treck [sic] to the Monaro each Spring, hunting for a type of yam and the Bogong moth larvae'.
A study of the ecology of the adult bogong moth, Agrotis infusa (Boisd.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), with special
He saw the deserted bark huts which the Aborigines had temporarily erected when collecting the bogong moths for their feasts.