bogus

(redirected from bogusly)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

bo·gus

 (bō′gəs)
adj.
1. Counterfeit or fake; not genuine: bogus money; bogus tasks.
2. Slang Not conforming with what one would hope to be the case; disappointing or unfair: It's bogus that you got to go to the party, and I had to stay home.
interj. Slang
Used to indicate disagreement or displeasure with another's actions or a circumstance.

[From obsolete bogus, a device for making counterfeit money.]

bogus

(ˈbəʊɡəs)
adj
spurious or counterfeit; not genuine: a bogus note.
[C19: from bogus apparatus for making counterfeit money; perhaps related to bogey1]
ˈbogusly adv
ˈbogusness n

bo•gus

(ˈboʊ gəs)

adj.
not genuine; counterfeit; phony.
[1825–30, Amer.; orig. an apparatus for coining false money; perhaps akin to bogy1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bogus - fraudulent; having a misleading appearance
counterfeit, imitative - not genuine; imitating something superior; "counterfeit emotion"; "counterfeit money"; "counterfeit works of art"; "a counterfeit prince"

bogus

adjective fake, false, artificial, forged, dummy, imitation, sham, fraudulent, pseudo (informal), counterfeit, spurious, ersatz, phoney or phony (informal) bogus insurance claims
real, true, actual, genuine, authentic, dinkum (Austral & N.Z. informal)

bogus

adjective
Fraudulently or deceptively imitative:
Translations
falešný
falskuægte
óekta, falskur
fiktyvus
fiktīvsneīstsviltots
nepraviponarejen

bogus

[ˈbəʊgəs] ADJ [claim] → falso, fraudulento; [interest] → fingido; [doctor, policeman] → falso

bogus

[ˈbəʊgəs] adj
[asylum seeker] → faux(fausse)
[claim, figure] → bidon inv
[company] → fantôme
a bogus marriage → un mariage blanc

bogus

adj doctor, lawyer, namefalsch; pearls also, documentgefälscht; company, transactionSchwindel-; claimerfunden; bogus asylum seekersScheinasylanten pl (pej)

bogus

[ˈbəʊgəs] adj (jewels, claim) → falso/a, fasullo/a; (person, attitude) → finto/a

bogus

(ˈbəugəs) adjective
false; not genuine. She was fooled by his bogus identity card.

bogus

a. falso-a; podrido-a.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, credit ratings agencies like Moody's and Standard & Poor's were criticized for giving bogusly high ratings to the bonds of financial firms that paid them.
Wayne Simmons, 62, of Annapolis, Maryland, bogusly portrayed himself as an "Outside Paramilitary Special Operations Officer" for the Central Intelligence Agency from 1973 to 2000, the U.
The ISIS recruiter who was arrested in Germany is a 21-year-old Moroccan who had bogusly registered as an asylum seeker in the Ludwigsburg district.
In 2007, her book The Shock Doctrine bogusly asserted that free market institutions spread only by taking advantage of coups, wars, and natural calamities.
NNA - The Government Commissioner to Military Court, Judge Sakr Sakr, on Tuesday filed a lawsuit against Hussein Al Hussein, accused of bogusly operating a twitter account in the name of Free Sunnis Brigade of Baalbak, through which Al Hussein sent threats to dignitaries in the region and security figures, adopted suicidal actions and tried to incite sectarian warfare in the country.
Literal drift nets--as well as other irresponsible fishing practices--cause large but unknown numbers of manta deaths per year, in addition to the senseless targeted hunting of them for traditional Chinese medicine: the rakers inside the "slashes of gills pulsing" are bogusly peddled as an immune booster and cancer cure.
The FBI file included numerous allegations reported to the bureau which, of course, the media at large bogusly reported as the bureau's own findings.
18) While an undergraduate he undertook considerable work for James Leonard Brierley Smith (1897-1968), the renowned South African ichthyologist accredited (probably bogusly, see Hodgson & Craig 2005: 5) with the identification of the first extant Coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae Smith).
Similarly, CORFing behavior has been exhibited by basketball fans that were less likely to accept a team poster immediately after a defeat (Bizmon & Yinon, 2002), by groups that were bogusly informed of poor performance on a skill task (Snyder et al.