bohunk


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Related to bohunk: Bohemia, hunkies
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bo·hunk

 (bō′hŭngk)
n. Offensive Slang
Used as a disparaging term for a person from east-central Europe, especially a laborer.

[Bo(hemian) + alteration of Hung(arian).]

bohunk

(ˈbəʊˌhʌŋk)
n
offensive slang US and Canadian a labourer from east or central Europe
[C20: blend of Bo(hemian) + Hung(arian), with alteration of g to k]

bohunk

- A lout—but was first a derogatory term for a Hungarian or person of east-central Europe, based on Bohemian Hungarian.
See also related terms for lout.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In B Squadron, all tanks were given a name that started with 'b', such as Barbara and Bohunk.
ORBAN IS MORE THAN THE BOHUNK version of Donald Trump that he is often portrayed as.
author and former Kansas man, Julian Jones,(Bohunk's Big To-Do) sounds fun and hopefully will get coverage in our media.
"Isn't that considerate of you, letting a Bohunk and a Jew even sit down in your presence," Bronstein said acidly.
Free to walk down the sidewalk in his Sunday best and not have some grimy, smelly, bohunk cross to the other side.
The Reverend believed that Peter Abramowicz was disadvantaged "because his Polish mentality and habits were not understood, they were never explained to the jury." In a more critical vein, John Duplanil maintained that the minds of the members of the jury might have been influenced by a widely held ethnic prejudice: "He was a foreigner, a 'bohunk.' In the mind of many he was a no-good fellow and the gallows were too good for him." Finally, Father Duplanil suggested that Peter Abramowicz might have faced bias because many people looked down upon those who lived in common law relationships.
Goska, for instance, maintains that "the image of the uncultured Bohunk had been depicted in popular literature before [Streetcar], but it entered the canon" with Williams's play which "dramatizes the racists' fear of miscegenation, and its twin conviction that America, overwhelmed by an influx of inferior others, was committing 'race suicide'" ("The Bohunk in American Cinema," Journal of Popular Culture 39.3 [2006]: 414).
"The Bohunk in American Cinema." JPC 39.3 (2006): 407-29.
I was an American, not a Bohunk or a Slovak or a greenhorn." (9)
One angry striker turned on him accusing this "small bohunk" of being one of the instigators of the strike.
Voting with our feet was inherently a dissent, and our democracy was raucous to start with: coonskin cap versus top hat, hillbilly or flatlander, hayseed, city slicker, bohunk or blue blood.
Eventually, Eva learns that she is the illegitimate daughter of a shady "bohunk" with whom her mother had an affair after the Second World War, and it is at this point that she begins to contemplate her place in a bloodline that extends far beyond her High Park home to a thousand-year legacy of invasions, wars and pogroms on the Eastern frontier of Europe.