boils


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boil 1

 (boil)
v. boiled, boil·ing, boils
v.intr.
1.
a. To change from a liquid to a vapor by the application of heat: All the water boiled away and left the kettle dry.
b. To reach the boiling point.
c. To undergo the action of boiling, especially in being cooked.
2. To be in a state of agitation; seethe: a river boiling over the rocks.
3. To be stirred up or greatly excited, especially in anger: The mere idea made me boil.
v.tr.
1.
a. To vaporize (a liquid) by the application of heat.
b. To heat to the boiling point.
2. To cook or clean by boiling.
3. To separate by evaporation in the process of boiling: boil the maple sap.
n.
1. The condition or act of boiling.
2. Lower Southern US A picnic featuring shrimp, crab, or crayfish boiled in large pots with spices, and then shelled and eaten by hand.
3. An agitated, swirling, roiling mass of liquid: "Those tumbling boils show a dissolving bar and a changing channel there" (Mark Twain).
Phrasal Verbs:
boil down
1. To reduce in bulk or size by boiling.
2. To condense; summarize: boiled down the complex document.
3. To constitute the equivalent of in summary: The scathing editorial simply boils down to an exercise in partisan politics.
boil over
1. To overflow while boiling.
2. To lose one's temper.

[Middle English boillen, from Old French boillir, from Latin bullīre, from bulla, bubble.]

boil′a·ble adj.
Synonyms: boil1, simmer, seethe, stew
These verbs mean, both literally and figuratively, to stir up or agitate. To boil is to heat a liquid until it churns with bubbles. Figuratively it pertains to intense agitation, often from anger: She boiled with rage at the insult.
Simmer denotes gentle cooking just at or below the boiling point. Figuratively it refers to a state of slow, contained ferment: Plans were simmering in his mind. The employees simmered with resentment over the cut in benefits.
To seethe is to boil steadily and vigorously. Its figurative usage can suggest vigorous activity or passionate emotion: "The arc lamp's cone of light seethes with winged insects" (Claire Davis)."The city had ... been seething with discontent" (John R. Green).
Stew refers literally to slow boiling and figuratively to a persistent but not violent state of agitation: "They don't want a man to fret and stew about his work" (William H. Whyte, Jr.).

boil 2

 (boil)
n.
A painful, circumscribed pus-filled inflammation of the skin and subcutaneous tissue usually caused by a local staphylococcal infection. Also called furuncle.

[Middle English bile, from Old English bȳle.]

boils

Inflammation of hair follicles and oil glands that has spread to the dermis. They are often caused by bacterial infection.
References in classic literature ?
'We cannot sleep, we wake and weep, Sharp is the knife, to take our life; The fire is hot, now boils the pot, And so we wake, and lie and quake.'
Lina saw this and said, 'Listen, old Sanna, why are you fetching so much water?' 'If you will never repeat it to anyone, I will tell you why.' So Lina said, no, she would never repeat it to anyone, and then the cook said: 'Early tomorrow morning, when the forester is out hunting, I will heat the water, and when it is boiling in the kettle, I will throw in Fundevogel, and will boil him in it.'
Last night, old Sanna carried so many buckets of water into the house that I asked her why she was doing that, and she said that if I would promise not to tell anyone, and she said that early tomorrow morning when father was out hunting, she would set the kettle full of water, throw you into it and boil you; but we will get up quickly, dress ourselves, and go away together.'
The Political Pot said it would not boil any more unless replenished from the Filthy Pool.
He came back again with the boiled mutton, and I was so excited by the appetising smell of it that I forgot the noise of the beast that had troubled me.
Still laughing and talking, the officers began hurriedly getting ready and again boiled again boiled some muddy water in the samovar.
When we gave a dinner at home, we had gravy soup, turbot and lobster-sauce, haunch of mutton, boiled fowls and tongue, lukewarm oyster-patties and sticky curry for side-dishes; wild duck, cabinet-pudding, jelly, cream and tartlets.
The coffee was never really made, but spluttered over every one, and boiled away, doing just what was required of it--that is, providing much cause for much noise and laughter, and spoiling a costly rug and the baroness's gown.
We descended into the gorge and had a supper which would have been very satisfactory if the trout had not been boiled. The Germans are pretty sure to boil a trout or anything else if left to their own devices.
"Baked, they were tough; and even boiled, they warn't things for a hungry man to hanker after."
A sulphurous smoke was curling amid the waves, which boiled like water in a copper.
Before Elizabeth was placed an enormous roasted turkey, and before Richard one boiled, in the centre of the table stood a pair of heavy silver casters, surrounded by four dishes: one a fricassee that consisted of gray squirrels; another of fish fried; a third of fish boiled; the last was a venison steak.