boldness


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bold

 (bōld)
adj. bold·er, bold·est
1.
a. Fearless and daring; courageous: a bold leader.
b. Requiring or exhibiting courage or daring: a bold voyage to unknown lands. See Synonyms at brave.
2. Unduly forward and brazen; impudent: a bold, sassy child.
3. Strikingly different or unconventional; arresting or provocative: "[He] laid out a bold, new vision for America's leading universities" (Jerome Karabel).
4.
a. Clear and distinct to the eye; conspicuous: bold colors; a bold pattern.
b. Strong or pronounced; prominent: the bold flavor of ginger.
5. Steep or abrupt in grade or terrain: "The two walk along the high, bold, rocky shore" (Harriet Beecher Stowe).
6. Printing Boldface.

[Middle English, from Old English bald; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

bold′ly adv.
bold′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boldness - the trait of being willing to undertake things that involve risk or danger; "the proposal required great boldness"; "the plan required great hardiness of heart"
fearlessness - the trait of feeling no fear
adventurousness, venturesomeness - the trait of being adventurous
daredevilry, daredeviltry - boldness as manifested in rash and daredevil behavior
audaciousness, audacity, temerity - fearless daring
brazenness, shamelessness - behavior marked by a bold defiance of the proprieties and lack of shame
timidity, timorousness - fearfulness in venturing into new and unknown places or activities
2.boldness - impudent aggressiveness; "I couldn't believe her boldness"; "he had the effrontery to question my honesty"
aggressiveness - the quality of being bold and enterprising
audaciousness, audacity - aggressive boldness or unmitigated effrontery; "he had the audacity to question my decision"
3.boldness - the quality of standing out strongly and distinctly
conspicuousness - high visibility

boldness

noun
Translations
جُرأةٍ، جَسارَةٍ
drzostsmělost
dristighed
dirfska
drznost
cesaretyüreklilik

boldness

[ˈbəʊldnɪs] N
1. (= daring) → audacia f
2. (= forwardness) → atrevimiento m, descaro m
3. (= striking quality) [of design, colours, clothes] → lo llamativo; [of lines, strokes] → lo enérgico; [of contrast] → lo marcado

boldness

[ˈbəʊldnɪs] n
(= fearlessness) → hardiesse f (= audacity) → audace f
(= impudence) → effronterie f
(= confidence) [artist, writer] → aplomb m, audace fbold type ncaractères mpl gras

boldness

n
(= bravery)Kühnheit f (geh), → Mut m; (of deed, plan also)Verwegenheit f
(= impudence, forwardness)Unverfrorenheit f, → Dreistigkeit f
(of colours, pattern, stripes)Kräftigkeit f; (of checks also)Grobheit f; (of strokes also)Kühnheit f (geh); (of style)Ausdruckskraft f

boldness

[ˈbəʊldnɪs] n (of person, plan) → audacia; (impudence) → sfacciataggine f, impudenza

bold

(bəuld) adjective
1. daring or fearless. a bold plan of attack.
2. striking and well-marked. a dress with bold stripes.
3. (of type) thick and clear, like this.
ˈboldly adverb
ˈboldness noun
bold as brass
very cheeky. She walked in late as bold as brass.
References in classic literature ?
Wonderful like is the case of boldness in civil business: what first?
Soon afterwards, observing that he was an animal altogether deficient in spirit, he assumed such boldness as to put a bridle in his mouth, and to let a child drive him.
Rather, O blessed one, give you me boldness to abide within the harmless laws of peace, avoiding strife and hatred and the violent fiends of death.
My lord," answered the man, "pardon my boldness and my persistence.
In his eyes lurked a look of perfectly remorseless irony, as though he had been provided with an extremely experienced soul; and the slightest distension of his nostrils would give to his bronzed face a look of extraordinary boldness.
My darling Walter," she said, "must we really account for our boldness in coming here?
The Venetians were not agreeable to it, nor was the King of Spain, and he had the enterprise still under discussion with the King of France; nevertheless he personally entered upon the expedition with his accustomed boldness and energy, a move which made Spain and the Venetians stand irresolute and passive, the latter from fear, the former from desire to recover the kingdom of Naples; on the other hand, he drew after him the King of France, because that king, having observed the movement, and desiring to make the Pope his friend so as to humble the Venetians, found it impossible to refuse him.
Everyone laughed, not at Marya Dmitrievna's answer but at the incredible boldness and smartness of this little girl who had dared to treat Marya Dmitrievna in this fashion.
If she read that the heroine of the novel was nursing a sick man, she longed to move with noiseless steps about the room of a sick man; if she read of a member of Parliament making a speech, she longed to be delivering the speech; if she read of how Lady Mary had ridden after the hounds, and had provoked her sister-in-law, and had surprised everyone by her boldness, she too wished to be doing the same.
Adorable Princess," said Aladdin to her, accosting her, and saluting her respectfully, "if I have the misfortune to have displeased you by my boldness in aspiring to the possession of so lovely a creature, I must tell you that you ought to blame your bright eyes and charms, not me.
They did not embrace each other, for where there is deep love there will never be overmuch boldness.
His person attracted attention, but above all the boldness of his look, which gave a singular expression to his face.