boll weevil


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boll weevil

n.
1. A small gray or brown weevil (Anthonomus grandis) of southern North America and Central America that damages cotton crops by laying eggs in and feeding on buds and bolls.
2. Informal A conservative white Southern Democrat in the US House of Representatives, especially during the second half of the 20th century.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

boll weevil

n
(Animals) a greyish weevil, Anthonomus grandis, of the southern US and Mexico, whose larvae live in and destroy cotton bolls. See also weevil1
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

boll′ wee′vil


n.
a snout beetle, Anthonomus grandis, that attacks the bolls of cotton.
[1890–95, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

boll weevil

- From Old English wifel, "beetle," and boll, the pod of the cotton plant, which this beetle attacks.
See also related terms for pod.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boll weevil - greyish weevil that lays its eggs in cotton bolls destroying the cottonboll weevil - greyish weevil that lays its eggs in cotton bolls destroying the cotton
weevil - any of several families of mostly small beetles that feed on plants and plant products; especially snout beetles and seed beetles
Anthonomus, genus Anthonomus - weevils destructive of cultivated plants
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

boll weevil

nBaumwollkapselkäfer m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
To what sort of crops is the boll weevil a major pest?
To pay homage to our iconic boll weevil monument, agriscience students will utilize a CAD program and the CNC machine to design and manufacture their own 3D version of the monument, which will depict the WeeCat Industries mascot, Cotton, holding up his friend and sidekick, Peanut, the boll weevil.
The tracks are "Soldier's Joy", "My Blue Ridge Mountain Home", "Garfield's March", "Winfield Story", "No Hard Times", "Blue Water Hornpipe", "Russian Lullaby", "Wednesday Night Waltz", "Boll Weevil", "Farewell to Long Hollow", "Susannah Gal", "Rights of Man", "A Dime Looks Like a Wagon Wheel", "Flop Eared Mule", and "A Song!
Morphology of the reproductive systems of the cotton boll weevil (Coleoptera, Curculionidae).
Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), after harvest, normally regrowth and produces new reproductive structures (Greenberg et al., 2007), which in the off-season period serve as refuge and feed for the boll weevil (Anthonomus grandisYang et al., 2006; Greenberg et al., 2007; Santos, 2015), the main pest of the Brazilian cotton crop (Miranda & Rodrigues, 2015).
To prevent the spread of the boll weevil, Florida and other states prohibit the noncommercial growing of any species of Gossypium except under a special permit, which Selby Gardens has obtained.
These practices reduce habitat and food available to the boll weevil, pink bollworm, boll-worm and tobacco budworm.
The mills offered workers steady work and pay--a welcome change to farmers who were in the midst of seeing their crops destroyed by the infamous boll weevil. The promise of the textile mills soon soured, however, under the mill store and the "stretchout" systems devised to improve productivity.
The governor-elect's meeting with Miller also included discussions on cattle inspection sites in Mexico, wait times at international land ports and boll weevil eradication on both sides of the river.
Both literary and musical worlds also share concerns with regional and experiential consciousness of the area's natural and societal problems: "the flooding of the Mississippi, relationships between paternalist white planters and black sharecroppers, male sexual impotence, incarceration at Parchman Farm, and racial violence, as well as the effects of the boll weevil upon southern agriculture" (22).