bollard


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bol·lard

 (bŏl′ərd)
n.
1. Nautical A thick post on a ship or wharf, used for securing ropes and hawsers.
2. One of a series of posts preventing vehicles from entering an area.
3. A projecting bulge of snow or ice used as an anchor for a rope in mountaineering.

[Middle English, probably from bole, tree trunk; see bole1.]

bollard

(ˈbɒlɑːd; ˈbɒləd)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a strong wooden or metal post mounted on a wharf, quay, etc, used for securing mooring lines
2. (Civil Engineering) Brit a small post or marker placed on a kerb or traffic island to make it conspicuous to motorists
3. (Mountaineering) mountaineering an outcrop of rock or pillar of ice that may be used to belay a rope
[C14: perhaps from bole1 + -ard]

bol•lard

(ˈbɒl ərd)

n.
1.
a. a thick low post, usu. of iron or steel, mounted on a wharf or the like, to which mooring lines from vessels are attached.
2. Brit. one of a series of short posts, esp. for excluding motor vehicles from a road.
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bollard - a strong post (as on a wharf or quay or ship for attaching mooring lines)bollard - a strong post (as on a wharf or quay or ship for attaching mooring lines); "the road was closed to vehicular traffic with bollards"
bitthead - the upper end of a bitt
pier, wharf, wharfage, dock - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats
post - an upright consisting of a piece of timber or metal fixed firmly in an upright position; "he set a row of posts in the ground and strung barbwire between them"
riding bitt - one of the large bitts used to secure the cable of a dropped anchor
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Translations
عَمود رَبْطِ حِبالِ المَرْكِب
pacholeuliční patník
betonpælfortøjningspæl
pollaritolppa
bornebittebollard
kikötõbakterelõoszlop
pollistöpull
knechtasstulpelis
barjera
cestný pätníkpoler
iskele babasıkısa işaret direği

bollard

[ˈbɒləd] N (Brit) (at roadside) → baliza f (Naut) → noray m, bolardo m

bollard

[ˈbɒlərd ˈbɒlɑːrd] n
(British) (= concrete post) → borne f
(for mooring)bitte f d'amarrage

bollard

n (on quay, road) → Poller m

bollard

[ˈbɒləd] n (on quay) → bitta (Brit) (to bar way) → pilastrino di chiusura al traffico; (at junction) → colonnina luminosa

bollard

(ˈbəlaːd) noun
1. a post for controlling traffic. The pedestrian shopping area has been closed off with bollards.
2. a short post on a wharf or ship round which ropes are fastened.
References in periodicals archive ?
A panicked Group Four Security driver fled in his van after crashing into a bollard in Paisley.
Worcester, MA, June 04, 2019 --(PR.com)-- Access Fixtures, a commercial, industrial, and sports lighting manufacturer based in Massachusetts, introduces a new open top bollard light to its current line of commercial LED bollards.
The 1,159 pages-long bill that was drafted by a bipartisan committee provides $1.4 billion for 55 miles of bollard fencing and an overall $1.7 billion increase in spending for the Department of Homeland Security.
Mr Bolton has spoken out about his safety concerns after a mum and her two children suffered cuts and bruises after their car hit an unlit traffic island with a missing bollard in Marsden last month.
The Telegraph contacted the council for further comment, and were told that the Bollard management was being carried out by an external contractor, who are posting a person at the site 24 hours a day.
"Liverpool city council, along with our contractor ATG, have identified further improvements in the bollard system that are being undertaken."
These temporary structures will be replaced this month by more attractive temporary blocks in advance of the rollout of the permanent metal bollard installation beginning this March.
One version with an integrated electromechanical operator for average use frequencies; a variant with an integrated hydraulic operator for very frequent use and the third variant being an automatic bollard RI-H with reinforced cylinder material, offering particularly high protection.
Alison Major said: "They look awful, they should have been a normal traffic bollard. They will be knocked over in no time or defaced with graffiti.
AN innovative business which is only a year old already has huge interest in its bollard testing equipment from all over the world.
Alan Bollard said they are working on a strategic study for free trade on Asia and the
A concrete bollard in Helsby is winning fans on social media with its cheerful demeanour and dashing dress sense.