boll

(redirected from bolls)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to bolls: boils, Bols

boll

seed pod of a plant, as flax or cotton
Not to be confused with:
bole – tree trunk
bowl – hemispherical vessel; a large wooden ball; a roll of the ball, as in bowling
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

boll

 (bōl)
n.
The seed-bearing capsule of certain plants, especially cotton and flax.

[Middle English, from Middle Dutch bolle, round object; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

boll

(bəʊl)
n
(Plants) the fruit of such plants as flax and cotton, consisting of a rounded capsule containing the seeds
[C13: from Dutch bolle; related to Old English bolla bowl1]

Böll

(German bœl)
n
(Biography) Heinrich (ˈhaɪnrɪç) (Theodor). 1917–85, German novelist and short-story writer; his novels include Group Portrait with Lady (1971): Nobel prize for literature 1972
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

boll

(boʊl)

n.
a rounded seed vessel or pod of a plant, as of flax or cotton.
[1400–50; late Middle English bolle, perhaps < Middle Dutch bolle]

Böll

(bœl)

n.
Heinrich (Theodor), 1917–85, German novelist: Nobel prize 1972.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Boll

 measure of capacity for grain [six bushels in Scotland]; a measure of weight [140 lb.].
Examples: boll of corn, 1651; of grain; of malt, 1725; of oats, 1590; of salt, 1691; of wheat, 1875.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Boll

Cottonseed pod.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boll - the rounded seed-bearing capsule of a cotton or flax plantboll - the rounded seed-bearing capsule of a cotton or flax plant
capsule - a dry dehiscent seed vessel or the spore-containing structure of e.g. mosses
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

boll

[bəʊl] N (Bot) → cápsula f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

boll

nSamenkapsel f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Each student carried a stalk of sugar-cane with some open bolls of cotton fastened to the end of it.
Though they might have two or three brass kettles hanging, in their lodges, yet they would frequently use vessels made of willow, for carrying water, and would even boll their meat in them, by means of hot stones.
These sundies feed on cotton bolls or flowers, and therefore cause direct and great yield losses.
Abstract.- The researchers and progressive farmers of cotton growers of Punjab, Pakistan had been worrying for six years from 2005 to 2010 for an obscure causing agent of the warts and internal lint damage (rotting) of cotton bolls. Consequently, a two years study was launched in 2010 and 2011 thoroughly aimed at investigating the actual causing insect pest of warts on the internal carpel wall of cotton bolls.
The bolls were filled with seeds and fiber; therefore, the respiration rates of the bolls were higher than the net photosynthesis rates.
Mechanics, make sure that all the bolls are installed in the engine lift brackets when pulling a CAT engine from an FMTV.
Bolls presents a short guide for people with Asperger Syndrome to take control of their minds and lives through meditation.
Paul Bolls, an associate professor of strategic communication at the MU School of Journalism and a 2011-2012 MU Reynolds Journalism Institute Fellow, has found that news consumers who have "reward-seeking" personalities are more likely to read their news online and on mobile devices, and to engage with websites, by leaving comments on stories and uploading user-generated content.
The adults infest developing cotton buds and damage bolls. They may also transmit cotton diseases.
The sellers were Betty and Nick Holloway; Mary Jo Bolls and her husband, Lillard; Lillard L.
At each location, 20 cotton plants were randomly selected and 5 bolls from each plant were removed and placed into a plastic bag.