bombload

bombload

(ˈbɒmˌləʊd)
n
(of a vehicle of war) the quantity of bombs being carried or able to be carried
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The aircraft required a 2,400-mile cruising range and a 2,000-pound bombload and yet needed to be small enough so that a "reasonable" number of them could fit on the back half of an aircraft carrier.
While the latter, carrying only 500kg (1,1021b) of bombs, was to be used almost exclusively for relatively short-ranged airfield attacks and battlefield interdiction, the Heinkel, with three-times the bombload, was intended for much deeper interdiction (rail ways, seaports, other logistics choke points) and strategic bombardment with a bombload almost identical to the "Ural Bomber's".
The Air Force wanted to use the B-52 Stratofortress against 94 targets throughout North Vietnam because of its all-weather capability, large bombload and radar, and could have attacked in early 1965 without being hampered by clouds or surface-to-air missiles.
She was still 25 miles from Berlin, still carrying her bombload and almost certainly on fire.
In reality even the largest bombers available in the First World War lacked the bombload and accuracy to interdict the supply of munitions to the front line, though air raids on cities had a considerable effect on civilian morale: as for Douhet, he spent part of the war in a military prison for being too free with the circulation of his memos.
Details of the operational requirement have not been published, but it is believed that AMX had to be able to deliver a 6000 lb (2720 kg) bombload over a LO-LO radius of 200 nm (370 km), using only internal fuel and carrying two AIM-9 Sidewinders for self-defence.
The Henschel Hs 126 had one fixed and one manually aimed machine gun, a bombload of 100 lb and a top speed of 221 m.
The B-24 could carry a heavier bombload than the B-17, could travel about 15 percent farther, and could fly faster using only three of its engines (at about 290 miles per hour) than a B-17 could using all four.
The XB-42 can claim to have been one of the most advanced piston-engine warplanes ever built --as fast as the speedy De Havilland Mosquito (at 488 miles per hour in its final form) but with twice the bombload (8,000 pounds).
The Focke Wulf Fw 200, being a commercial airliner, had a rather small bombload and was relatively fragile, often suffering catastrophic structural failures on landing (see photos on Google).
8 In fact the finest flying boat of the Second World War was Japan's Kawanishi HSK2, a type which first flew just over three years after the Sunderland prototype: with 27% more power it had more than twice the rate of climb and bombload, 54% longer range, 27% more speed, and a 65% higher ceiling, and whereas the Sunderland was armed with eight rifle calibre machine guns, the H8K2 carried five 20mm cannon as well as machine guns.
Word of the surrender and orders to return to ship reached the US Navy's Task Force 38 pilots as they zipped toward Japan with full bombloads.