bonasus

bonasus

(bəˈneɪsəs)
n
a name for the wisent or European bison (Bison bonasus)
References in periodicals archive ?
One interesting phenomenon sportfishing captains observed in Chesapeake Bay back in the mid-1960s was the association of cobia and cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus).
In addition, cattle sequences were significantly different from Bison bonasus, Bos javanicus, Bos grunniens and Bubalus bubalis, as well as the sequences of Ovis aries and Capra hircus.
Antioxidant enzyme activity and mrna expression in reproductive tract of adult male european bison (Bison bonasus, linnaeus 1758).
The Cownose ray Rhinoptera bonasus (Mitchill, 1815) (Myliobatidae) is an oceanic species found occasionally in sandy bottoms near the coast, feeding a variety number of bivalve mollusks and other benthic prey (Figueiredo, 1977; Froese and Pauly, 2016).
One of the common prey items of these sharks was the cownose ray (Rhinoptera bonasus), which feed on scallops and clams in the Chesapeake Bay.
The Cownose Ray (Rhinoptera bonasus) is also known as Cowfish or Skeete.
The Australian Border Force (ABF) has identified a number of labour hire intermediaries involved in sourcing illegal labour and sending money derived from this exploitation offshore, following an Australia-wide Operation codenamed Bonasus.
This story does not stop at the North American plains subspecies (Bison bison bison), but it also applies to the North American woods bison subspecies (Bison bison athabascae) along with the European bison species (Bison bonasus; wisent).
Thus, ray (Rhinoptera bonasus) liver oil could be used as an alternative source for [omega]-3 PUFA's; however, due to the high degree of instauration of these oils, special care has to be taken in order to avoid lipid oxidation and rancidity, which can affect its shelf life (IGLESIAS & MEDINA, 2008).
A noteworthy tipping point in food availability will potentially be realized if submarket and market oysters (<76 mm shell height and >76 mm shell height, respectively) on oyster grounds in the lower James River become scarce due to a combination of predation [e.g., rapa whelk, blue crab, cownose ray Rhinoptera bonasus (Mitchill, 1815)], oyster disease, freshets, and/or fishing activity.
Spatial distribution and long-term movement patterns of cownose rays Rhinoptera bonasus within an estuarine river.
Effects of external biotelemetry transmitters on behavior of the cownose ray Rhinoptera bonasus (Mitchill, 1815).