bone ash


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bone ash

n.
The white, powdery calcium phosphate ash of burned bones, used as a fertilizer, in making ceramics, and in cleaning and polishing compounds.

bone ash

n
(Chemistry) the residue obtained when bones are burned in air, consisting mainly of calcium phosphate. It is used as a fertilizer and in the manufacture of bone china

bone′ ash`


n.
a white ash obtained by calcining bones, used as a fertilizer and in the making of bone china.
[1615–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bone ash - ash left when bones burn; high in calcium phosphate; used as fertilizer and in bone china
ash - the residue that remains when something is burned
References in periodicals archive ?
Akristos, of Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, is making eco-friendly bricks from the bone ash left behind when cattle carcasses are incinerated.
A Midland firm is making ecofriendly bricks from the bone ash left behind when cattle carcasses are incinerated.
There was good agreement between values found by ETAAS and the certified value for SRM 1400 bone ash (9.
Bone ash, steamed bone meal and bone charcoal can be seen as having no link to the disease, according to a team of technology experts within the ministry, ministry officials said.
Some glaze formulas or recipes also use volcanic ash or even bone ash.
The addition of bone ash - and using an even higher firing temperature - is what distinguishes bone china.
All mean values were within reported normal values of 1-8 ng/mg bone ash when performed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry [3-5].
I have seen such evidence as bone ash still in the furnaces.
Animal studies on our BoneRenew(TM) formula have shown significant increases in both Bone Mineral Density and Bone Ash Weight," Dr.
Amongst bone characteristics measured, total bone ash was found to be slightly higher in the SBM-AP group compared to other groups.
In fact, Spode wasn't the first factory to use bone ash in the manufacture of porcelain - others had used it as part of their soft-paste formula in the 18th century - but Spode is credited with its first use in the hard-paste porcelain mix that was to become the bone china we are familiar with today.
The bone ash in the body (almost 50 percent) bleaches the iron present and seems to render whiter bodies with slightly impure kaolins than the very pure ones.