bone ash


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bone ash

n.
The white, powdery calcium phosphate ash of burned bones, used as a fertilizer, in making ceramics, and in cleaning and polishing compounds.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bone ash

n
(Chemistry) the residue obtained when bones are burned in air, consisting mainly of calcium phosphate. It is used as a fertilizer and in the manufacture of bone china
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bone′ ash`


n.
a white ash obtained by calcining bones, used as a fertilizer and in the making of bone china.
[1615–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bone ash - ash left when bones burn; high in calcium phosphate; used as fertilizer and in bone china
ash - the residue that remains when something is burned
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chiang said that the offer will be of no use to him, as he will opt for scattering his bone ash on his field.
It was made with bone ash, feldspar, kaolin and quartz.
Some previous experiments showed positive effects of OAs on bone ash and mineral retention in pig (Jongbloed et al., 2000) and rainbow trout (Vielma and Lall, 1997).
In order to determine bone ash, tibia bones were dried at 105 C for 24 h and then put in a furnace at 550 C for 24 h.
The crucible was made of bone ash and absorbed the lead and any other base metals during the firing process leaving only gold and silver.
A new flint mill and paint shop were erected and bone ash and stone and china clay were imported from Cornwall to enable a soft paste porcelain to be made in substantial quantities from about 1826.
However, when he tried to source the technology - to make opaque or translucent glass whitened by adding tin dioxide and bone ash - he was stonewalled.
The bone ash was diluted with deionized water to determine the calcium content present [27-29].
Present study is focused on wear properties of Chicken Bone Ash reinforced Aluminium 8011 Metal matrix composites.