bonnet


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bon·net

 (bŏn′ĭt)
n.
1.
a. A hat of cloth or straw, often held in place by ribbons tied under the chin and traditionally worn by women and children.
b. Scots A brimless cap traditionally worn by men or boys.
2. A removable metal plate over a machine part, such as a valve.
3. Chiefly British The hood of an automobile.
4.
a. A windscreen for a chimney.
b. A cover for a fireplace.
5. Nautical A strip of canvas laced to a fore-and-aft sail to increase sail area.
tr.v. bon·net·ed, bon·net·ing, bon·nets
To put a bonnet on.

[Middle English bonet, cap, from Old French, material for a headdress, perhaps from Medieval Latin obbonis, probably of Germanic origin.]

bonnet

(ˈbɒnɪt)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) any of various hats worn, esp formerly, by women and girls, usually framing the face and tied with ribbons under the chin
2. (Clothing & Fashion)
a. a soft cloth cap
b. formerly, a flat brimless cap worn by men
3. (Automotive Engineering) the hinged metal part of a motor vehicle body that provides access to the engine, or to the luggage space in a rear-engined vehicle
4. (Architecture) a cowl on a chimney
5. (Nautical Terms) nautical a piece of sail laced to the foot of a foresail to give it greater area in light winds
6. (in the US and Canada) a headdress of feathers worn by some tribes of American Indians, esp formerly as a sign of war
[C14: from Old French bonet, from Medieval Latin abonnis, of unknown origin]

bon•net

(ˈbɒn ɪt)

n., v. -net•ed, -net•ing. n.
1. a hat, usu. tying under the chin and often framing the face, formerly much worn by women but now worn mostly by children.
2. any hat worn by women.
3. Scot. a man's or boy's cap.
4. any bonnetlike headdress.
5. a cowl, hood, or cap for stabilizing the draft in a fireplace or chimney.
6. a covering for a valve stem.
7. Brit. an automobile hood.
8. a supplementary piece of canvas laced to the foot of a fore-and-aft sail.
v.t.
9. to put a bonnet on.
[1375–1425; late Middle English bonet < Middle French; Old French]

bonnet

hood

In British English, the metal cover over the engine of a car is called the bonnet.

I lifted the bonnet to see what the problem was.

In American English, it is called the hood.

I looked under the hood to watch the mechanic at work.

bonnet

(car) hood
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bonnet - a hat tied under the chinbonnet - a hat tied under the chin    
chapeau, hat, lid - headdress that protects the head from bad weather; has shaped crown and usually a brim
sunbonnet - a large bonnet that shades the face; worn by girls and women
2.bonnet - protective covering consisting of a metal part that covers the enginebonnet - protective covering consisting of a metal part that covers the engine; "there are powerful engines under the hoods of new cars"; "the mechanic removed the cowling in order to repair the plane's engine"
aeroplane, airplane, plane - an aircraft that has a fixed wing and is powered by propellers or jets; "the flight was delayed due to trouble with the airplane"
auto, automobile, car, motorcar, machine - a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car to get to work"
hood ornament - an ornament on the front of the hood of a car emblematic of the manufacturer
protective cover, protective covering, protection - a covering that is intend to protect from damage or injury; "they had no protection from the fallout"; "wax provided protection for the floors"
Verb1.bonnet - dress in a bonnet
hat - put on or wear a hat; "He was unsuitably hatted"
Translations
غِطَاء مُحَرِّك السيَّارةغِطاءُ مُحَرِّكِ السيّارهقُبَّعَةٌ، غِطاءٌ للرأس
kapotakloboučekčepeček
motorhjelmkyse
kapott
konepeltihilkka
hauba
fõkötõfőkötő
kven- eîa barnshatturvélarhlíf, húdd
ボンネット
보닛
antvožasskrybėlaitė
aubecepurītepārsegs
čepicapokrov motorja
motorhuv
ฝากระโปรงรถยนต์
cốp xe ôtô

bonnet

[ˈbɒnɪt] N
1. (woman's) → gorra f; (large, showy) → papalina f, toca f (esp Scot) (man's) → gorra f escocesa; (baby's) → gorro m
2. (Brit) (Aut) → capó m, cofre m (Mex)

bonnet

[ˈbɒnət] n
(British) [car] → capot m
(= hat) → bonnet m

bonnet

n
(woman’s) → Haube f; (baby’s) → Häubchen nt; (esp Scot, man’s) → Mütze f
(Brit Aut) → Motor- or Kühlerhaube f
(of chimney)Schornsteinkappe f

bonnet

[ˈbɒnɪt] n
a. (Brit) (Aut) → cofano
b. (woman's, baby's) → cuffia (esp Scot) (man's) → berretto

bonnet

(ˈbonit) noun
1. (usually baby's or (old) woman's) head-dress fastened under the chin eg by strings.
2. (American hood) the cover of a motor-car engine.

bonnet

غِطَاء مُحَرِّك السيَّارة kapota motorhjelm Motorhaube καπό capó, capote konepelti capot hauba cofano ボンネット 보닛 motorkap panser maska samochodu capô do carro капот motorhuv ฝากระโปรงรถยนต์ motor kapağı cốp xe ôtô 引擎罩
References in classic literature ?
The instant it was over Polly rushed away and bought not only the kids but a bonnet frame, a bit of illusion, and a pink crape rose, which had tempted her for weeks in a certain shop window, then home and to work with all the skill and speed of a distracted milliner.
I feel as if I had been stamping and screaming and beating you with my hateful little bonnet, ever since I was born, darling
cried Miss Knag, regarding herself with great favour in the glass as she tied her bonnet.
Wragge without a word, ran into her own room, tore off her cloak, bonnet and wig, and threw them down out of sight in the blank space between the sofa-bedstead and the wall.
I go to the door, wondering who it is; there, I meet a pair of bright eyes, and a blushing face; they are Dora's eyes and face, and Miss Lavinia has dressed her in tomorrow's dress, bonnet and all, for me to see.
Through all the flimsy things we see at once As easily as through a Naples bonnet - Trash of all trash
Then, again, if you fix your eye upon this strange, crested, comb-like incrustation on the top of the mass --this green, barnacled thing, which the Greenlanders call the crown, and the Southern fishers the bonnet of the Right Whale; fixing your eyes solely on this, you would take the head for the trunk of some huge oak, with a bird's nest in its crotch.
McGregor also; and certainly for the day, because she was wearing her best bonnet.
A good way of enraging her was to say that her last year's bonnet would do for this year without alteration, or that it would defy the face of clay to count the number of her shawls.
The evening come, she put on her bonnet and shawl, and went quietly out: having her reasons for hovering in a furtive way about the station by which a passenger would arrive from Yorkshire, and for preferring to peep into it round pillars and corners, and out of ladies' waiting-room windows, to appearing in its precincts openly.
Fagin offered no reply to this compliment: but, pulling Sikes by the sleeve, pointed his finger towards Nancy, who had taken advantage of the foregoing conversation to put on her bonnet, and was now leaving the room.
Maggie's hair, as she threw off her bonnet, painfully confirmed her mother's accusation.