spicule

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spic·ule

 (spĭk′yo͞ol) also spic·u·la (-yə-lə)
n. pl. spic·ules also spic·u·lae (-yə-lē)
1. A small needlelike structure or part, such as one of the silicate or calcium carbonate processes supporting the soft tissue of certain invertebrates, especially sponges.
2. Astronomy A spike-shaped formation emanating from the ionized gas of the solar photosphere.

[Latin spīculum; see spiculum.]

spic′u·lar (-yə-lər), spic′u·late (-yə-lĭt, -lāt′) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

spicule

(ˈspɪkjuːl)
n
1. (Biology) Also called: spiculum a small slender pointed structure or crystal, esp any of the calcareous or siliceous elements of the skeleton of sponges, corals, etc
2. (Astronomy) astronomy a spiked ejection of hot gas occurring over 5000 kilometres above the sun's surface (in its atmosphere) and having a diameter of about 1000 kilometres
[C18: from Latin: spiculum]
spiculate adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

spic•ule

(ˈspɪk yul)

n.
1. a small, needlelike crystal, process, or the like.
2. one of the small, hard, calcareous or siliceous bodies that serve as the skeletal elements of various marine and freshwater invertebrates.
[1775–85; < Latin spīculum]
spic′u•late` (-yəˌleɪt, -lɪt) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

spic·ule

(spĭk′yo͞ol)
A needle-like structure or part, such as one of the mineral structures supporting the soft tissue of certain invertebrates, especially sponges.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spicule - small pointed structure serving as a skeletal element in various marine and freshwater invertebrates e.g. sponges and coralsspicule - small pointed structure serving as a skeletal element in various marine and freshwater invertebrates e.g. sponges and corals
appendage, outgrowth, process - a natural prolongation or projection from a part of an organism either animal or plant; "a bony process"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

spic·ule

n. espícula, cuerpo en forma de aguja.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the bone of contention was "can such a small bony spicule be a source of craniofacial pain?" Although it is inviting to speculate that the intricate vascular and diverse neural networks within the tensor tympani muscle attached to the pterygoid hamulus as a plausible explanation, it cannot be substantiated by the scarcity of reports published in the literature.
Fundus changes in retinitis pigmentosa include waxy pallor of optic disc (black arrow), arteriolar attenuation (white arrow head) and bony spicule pigmentation (white arrow) in the mid-peripheral fundus, which is predominantly populated by rods.
Healing was uneventful when examined after 3 weeks except for a small inflammatory area and a bony spicule (Figure 9).
High-resolution computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bones showed significant ossicular displacement; no evidence of a fracture or penetrating bony spicule involving the tympanic segment of the facial nerve was found (figure).
It was also found that in some atlas vertebrae a bony spicule arises from a posterior side of superior articular surface or the lateral side of superior articular surface.
They are not an extra medullary site of haematopoiesis, as they contain fat and lack bony spicules and reticular sinusoids.