book learning


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book learning

n.
Knowledge acquired through study, especially of written material, in contrast to knowledge acquired through practical experience.

book′-learn′ed (bo͝ok′lûr′nĭd) adj.
References in classic literature ?
He had no book learning, no art, like the other men.
For that matter, she found in Billy a certain health and rightness, a certain essential integrity, which she prized more highly than all book learning and bank accounts.
"But I ought to tell you that Renard was a Parisian, and dependent on his father, a wholesale grocer, who had educated his son with a view to making a notary of him; so Renard had come by a certain amount of book learning before he had been drawn by the conscription and had to bid his desk good-bye.
Speaking at the opening ceremony, Major Bowser, chairman of the County of Perth and of the Joint County Council, said : "Education is not all book learning it is vital that children also learn such things as discipline, obedience, respect and consideration for others."
Book learning and exams are part of the education process but Mr Bagnall, as a teacher, will be aware of the need to encourage youngsters to build on their natural idealism and he should be anxious to help them develop as concerned citizens keen to play their part protecting the planet for future generations.
Today, schools are just providing 'book learning' not teaching them anything beyond their text books.
Even though most of the ballads forswear book learning, they all open by welcoming audiences to join them on the frontier.
Book learning. Books are the cheapest and most efficient way to study new skills.
The labs are designed to spur the spark of creativity, and go beyond regular curriculum and text book learning. The labs will also enable students explore skills of future such as design and computational thinking, adaptive learning and artificial intelligence.
The book is written with humor and occasionally might spur you to indulge in a little more book learning. For example, I didn't know Sir Isaac Newton put the first optic on a gun, and ballistics was a large part of his studies.
I believe teacher and neurologist Judy Willis would recognise the following scenario with such great familiarity that it became the impetus to write her book Learning to Love Math: Teaching Strategies That Change Student Attitudes and Get Results.
She is, she explains, better at book learning than at learning by doing, yet she is thrilled to participate as a reporter in a Haisla Rediscovery Camp where teen boys fish and gather and learn the histories of the people of the area.