bookdealer


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Related to bookdealer: Book dealer
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bookdealer - a dealer in booksbookdealer - a dealer in books; a merchant who sells books
merchandiser, merchant - a businessperson engaged in retail trade
References in periodicals archive ?
Bonhams spokeswoman Charlotte Wood said: "It was bought by a bookdealer on behalf of a private client and it will be staying in the UK."
The book is expected to fetch pounds 2000 at London auctioneers Bonhams' two-day sale of Yorkshire bookdealer Tony Hattersley's collection.
From there, I spoke to the assistant vice president in Books and Manuscripts at Sotheby's and found that it had gone to a London bookdealer, Bernard Quaritch, who, presumably, bought it for a client.
They indeed do not solve the mystery of the Beinecke Library's celebrated manuscript, named after the Lithuanian-born bookdealer Wilfrid Voynich, who claimed to have found it in a monastic collection in Italy in 1912.
AB Bookman was last published in 1999, but Arizona bookdealer, Rick Russell, has now licensed the name and logo for Internet use and is ready to re-launch the magazine online.
(3) The program began in 1995 when Professor Kent Emery of the University of Notre Dame (a world-renowned specialist in the Carthusian order) brought to the library's attention a precious Carthusian manuscript in the catalogue of a German antiquarian bookdealer. The Newberry challenged Professor Emery to help with the financial burden.
In the ghetto, in a passageway that led to Gesia Street, stood a former employee of the famous bookdealer of Warsaw, Fayvel Rosen.
Bookdealer Harrold, 35, denies murdering his wife and conspiring to murder her.
Some 340 of these letters survive, the correspondence beginning in 1904 and ending just days before Bent's death.(10) Deaf and nearly blind from a bout of rheumatic fever that had ended his formal education before he completed high school, Hyde pieced together a living as a bookdealer and a researcher.
Following news reports that Amazon.com gives preferential treatment to reviews of books whose publishers pay for the privilege, the online bookdealer now says it will disclose when it promotes books backed by advertising dollars, effective March 1.
Noble Romans obtained most of their books through their social connections rather than from booksellers: as Starr says, `the booktrade was merely an ancillary system of circulation beside the private channels that probably supplied the vast majority of literary texts'.(12) The author who wanted critical advice would usually have his work read to a small circle of friends; `publication' normally meant giving the book to its dedicatee with permission to copy, then to other friends, and perhaps depositing a copy with a library or bookdealer. And so in most cases the published book would make its way copy by copy, from friend to friend, out into the world.
There, Scaliger and Constantin had another close friend in the publisher and bookdealer Antoine Vincent, who obtained a privilege to publish in early September 1560 (Constantin himself got the rights seven months later to an annotated edition of this and other works of Scaliger).