book of hours

(redirected from books of hours)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

book of hours

n.
A book containing Christian prayers and other devotional texts arranged according to the canonical hours and the feast days of the liturgical calendar. Many medieval books of hours, intended for use by wealthy or aristocratic laypeople, are noted for their rich illumination.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

book of hours

n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) (often capitals) a book used esp in monasteries during the Middle Ages that contained the prayers and offices of the canonical hours
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
Stundenbuch
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
They concentrate on the Psalter as a devotional book and include Breviaries, Antiphonals, and Books of Hours, in which the Psalms appear as they were used in the medieval liturgy, but not whole Bibles, in which the Psalms also appear but not as liturgy.
"Most manuscripts of this age are religious, prayer books and books of hours, but here we have interesting stories of my thology and history.
The second half of The Sense of Sound, Chapters 5-8, explores the internal sound world of prayer through an examination of iconography in Books of Hours and, by extrapolation, plausible connections in terms of like manner of presentation and decoration with a group of motets in the Montpellier Codex.
He turns to deluxe Books of Hours most often, reading from their images--especially those of the Labors of the Months--clear documentation both of the sartorial coding of class and of beliefs about the habits of the lower classes on the part of these books' upper-class owners.
"Books Of Hours are among the most personal artworks.
Among the topics are collections of books owned by the Percy family, penwork flourishing of initials, hierarchies of decoration in books of hours, and the last Bohun Hours and Psalter.
Many Books of Hours are part of museum collections.
Jean de France, Duc de Berry, son, brother and uncle of successive kings of France, was a notable patron of the arts, commissioning numerous treasures from gold chalices to castles, but he is remembered above all for his interest in manuscripts, especially the personal prayer books known as Books of Hours. Some time between 1405 and 1408 he commissioned the famed Limbourg brothers, at the time still in their early teens, to create the Belles Heures-and allowed them considerable latitude within the conventions of the genre.
Leaping backwards 400 years, staff have also been engaged in the digitisation of two of the Library's medieval Books of Hours. The volumes form part of the Clifford Collection (http://nla.gov.au/nla.ms-ms1097), which was purchased in 1963 from the Clifford family of Ugbrooke Park, Devon, one of the great Catholic families in England.
These words are found in all medieval Books of Hours, the devotional books made for the laity.
Books of hours, in both manuscript and printed versions, provide valuable clues to the beliefs and devotional habits of medieval people.
Eamon Duffy's newest book, Marking the Hours, lends new meanings to the definition of a "used book." In the history of medieval prayer, Books of Hours were among the most widely used Latin devotional texts.