phenomenon

(redirected from booster phenomenon)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

phe·nom·e·non

 (fĭ-nŏm′ə-nŏn′, -nən)
n. pl. phe·nom·e·na (-nə)
1. An occurrence, circumstance, or fact that is perceptible by the senses.
2. pl. phe·nom·e·nons
a. An unusual, significant, or unaccountable fact or occurrence; a marvel.
b. A remarkable or outstanding person; a paragon. See Synonyms at wonder.
3. Philosophy In the philosophy of Kant, an object as it is perceived by the senses, as opposed to a noumenon.
4. Physics An observable event.

[Late Latin phaenomenon, from Greek phainomenon, from neuter present participle of phainesthai, to appear; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Phenomenon is the only acceptable singular form of this noun; phenomena is the usual plural. Phenomenons may also be used as the plural in nonscientific writing when the meaning is "extraordinary things, occurrences, or persons": They were phenomenons in the history of music.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

phenomenon

(fɪˈnɒmɪnən)
n, pl -ena (-ɪnə) or -enons
1. anything that can be perceived as an occurrence or fact by the senses
2. any remarkable occurrence or person
3. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the object of perception, experience, etc
b. (in the writings of Kant) a thing as it appears and is interpreted in perception and reflection, as distinguished from its real nature as a thing-in-itself. Compare noumenon
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek phainomenon, from phainesthai to appear, from phainein to show]
Usage: Although phenomena is often treated as if it were singular, correct usage is to employ phenomenon with a singular construction and phenomena with a plural: that is an interesting phenomenon (not phenomena); several new phenomena were recorded in his notes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phe•nom•e•non

(fɪˈnɒm əˌnɒn, -nən)

n., pl. -na (-nə) or, esp. for 3, -nons.
1. a fact, occurrence, or circumstance observed or observable: the phenomena of nature.
2. something that is remarkable or extraordinary.
3. a remarkable or exceptional person; prodigy.
4. Philos.
a. an appearance or immediate object of awareness in experience.
b. (in Kantian philosophy) a thing as it appears to and is constructed by the mind, as distinguished from a noumenon, or thing-in-itself.
[1595–1605; < Late Latin phaenomenon < Greek phainómenon appearance, n. use of neuter present participle of phaínesthai to appear, pass. of phaínein to show]
usage: As with other plurals of Latin or Greek origin, there is a tendency to use the plural phenomena as a singular (This phenomena will not be seen again); such use, which is usually criticized by usage guides, occurs infrequently in edited writing. See also criterion, media1.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

phenomenon

A phenomenon is something that happens or exists and that can be seen or experienced.

We are witnessing a very significant phenomenon.
Many theories have been put forward to explain this phenomenon.

The plural of 'phenomenon' is phenomena, not 'phenomenons'.

...scientific explanations of natural phenomena.
All of these phenomena required explanation.

Be Careful!
Phenomena is only a plural form. You do not talk about 'a phenomena' or 'this phenomena'.

Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phenomenon - any state or process known through the senses rather than by intuition or reasoningphenomenon - any state or process known through the senses rather than by intuition or reasoning
physical process, process - a sustained phenomenon or one marked by gradual changes through a series of states; "events now in process"; "the process of calcification begins later for boys than for girls"
natural phenomenon - all phenomena that are not artificial
levitation - the phenomenon of a person or thing rising into the air by apparently supernatural means
metempsychosis, rebirth - after death the soul begins a new cycle of existence in another human body
consequence, effect, result, upshot, outcome, event, issue - a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon; "the magnetic effect was greater when the rod was lengthwise"; "his decision had depressing consequences for business"; "he acted very wise after the event"
fortune, hazard, luck, chance - an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that causes an event to result one way rather than another; "bad luck caused his downfall"; "we ran into each other by pure chance"
fortune, luck - an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that leads to a favorable outcome; "it was my good luck to be there"; "they say luck is a lady"; "it was as if fortune guided his hand"
pulsation - a periodically recurring phenomenon that alternately increases and decreases some quantity
2.phenomenon - a remarkable development
development - a recent event that has some relevance for the present situation; "recent developments in Iraq"; "what a revolting development!"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

phenomenon

noun
1. occurrence, happening, fact, event, incident, circumstance, episode scientific explanations of this natural phenomenon
2. wonder, sensation, spectacle, sight, exception, miracle, marvel, prodigy, rarity, nonpareil The Loch Ness monster is not the only bizarre phenomenon that bookmakers take bets on.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

phenomenon

noun
1. Something having real, demonstrable existence:
2. One that evokes great surprise and admiration:
Idioms: one for the books, the eighth wonder of the world.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
ظاهِرَه
jevúkazfenomén
fænomen
ilmiö
jelenségtüneménytünetfenomén
fyrirbæri
fenomenalusfenomenas
fenomensparādība
jav
pojav
pojava
fenomen

phenomenon

[fɪˈnɒmɪnən] N (phenomenons or phenomena (pl)) → fenómeno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

phenomenon

[fɪˈnɒmɪnən] [phenomena] [fɪˈnɒmɪnə] (pl) nphénomène m
to be a new phenomenon → être un phénomène nouveau
a natural phenomenon → un phénomène naturel
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

phenomenon

n pl <phenomena> → Phänomen nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

phenomenon

[fɪˈnɒmɪnən] n (phenomena (pl)) [fɪˈnɒmɪnə]fenomeno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

phenomenon

(fəˈnomənən) , ((American) -non) plural pheˈnomena (-nə) noun
a natural fact or event that is seen or happens regularly or frequently. Magnetic attraction is an interesting phenomenon.
pheˈnomenal adjective
very unusual; remarkable. a phenomenal amount of money.
pheˈnomenally adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

phe·nom·e·non

n. fenómeno.
evento o manifestación de cualquier índole;
síntoma objetivo de una enfermedad.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

phenomenon

n fenómeno; Raynaud’s — fenómeno de Raynaud
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although some of the elevated conversion rate of the early 1990s resulted from the booster phenomenon, much was due to occupationally acquired infection.
The booster phenomenon confounds the interpretation of the PPD test, complicating TB control programs (12).
The booster phenomenon is now minimized in hospitals because the efforts of TB control leaders have resulted in frequent skin testing.