booster seat

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booster seat

n.
1. A car seat for a small child that lifts the child by several inches, designed for use with an adult seat belt.
2. A seat placed on top of the seat of a chair, used to elevate a small child at a table.
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And last year's law change means that backless booster seats or booster cushions will only be approved for use by children taller than 125cm and weighing more than 22kg.
Parents and caregivers can help protect children by making sure they are properly secured in child seats, booster seats or seatbelts at all times.
When the new law comes into place, backless booster seats will only be approved for use for children taller than 125cm and weighing more than 22kg.
New laws coming in this year mean that backless booster seats will no longer be suitable for many children in the UK.
At the time, new laws in California about booster seats meant that we could provide a gap in the market quickly.
The recall comes with new rules due to be introduced later this year which will see car booster seats without a back banned for younger children.
UNDER new rules that will come into force later this year, car booster seats without a back are to be banned for younger children.
Booster seats reposition the height and angle of the seatbelt tightly across the chest and lower on the waist, increasing protection from injury and death in the event of a collision, as well as reducing injury severity.
BOOSTER seats can help keep older children safer before they're ready for safety belts.
Grainne was frustrated having to transport bulky, hard booster seats on planes and car rental companies not providing booster seats for her children, so she designed her own portable booster seat.
The call follows a survey revealing that only one in four parents know the law on child and booster seats.
Only 26 per cent of mothers and fathers know the law on child and booster seats and around the same number use seats that do not fit, the poll by road safety charity Brake found.