boosterish

Related to boosterish: boisterous

boosterish

(ˈbuːstərɪʃ)
adj
designed to boost business; optimistic
References in periodicals archive ?
Boosterish claims of progress in US-China trade talks lifted global stocks on Friday, sending Wall Street to its longest winning streak in more than two decades.
The shooting, animation, and narrative structure of A Leaf of Faith are sloppy; the tone veers between boosterish infomercial and conspiracy theorizing about big pharma.
At night, it blinks out a playful pattern of colors and boosterish slogans on its high-tech outer skin " a few parts light show, a few parts bumper sticker.
On orders from above, Wright continues, the paper also provided what he calls "boosterish" coverage of Adelson's efforts to move the Oakland Raiders to Las Vegas.
Compared to the boosterish tone of much of its press, academic critiques of big data have been relatively muted, often focusing on the continued importance of more traditional forms of domain knowledge and expertise.
India's supposed "demographic dividend" - an overwhelmingly youthful population - seems like so much more boosterish talk by those policy entrepreneurs.
His ongoing series "Self-Portraits," 2012-, several of which were on view in the upstairs gallery, features a profile silhouette of the artist filled with precisely such boosterish fare, here meant to be ironically savored as at once all too familiar and vaguely unreal.
In this context union leaders faded in importance; furthermore, even when union leaders stayed engaged in civic affairs, they tended to become junior partners in their Chamber of Commerce colleagues' boosterish schemes.
A utopian vision of a control society--present in Hayek's theory of price in paeans to the 'network society', and in boosterish accounts of urban informatics--would see this as the goal: the end of discipline, the end of specialism and the end of critique.
(And since where I grew up people regarded disco the way the HUAC regarded communism, this strain prevailed throughout the '70s and beyond, until--in a Sinclair Lewis-meets-"Soul Train" kind of way--native-son Prince turned everyone into boosterish converts to funk.) One of the first non-animated movies I saw in the theater was 1974's "The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams," in which Dan Haggerty's character, wrongfully accused of murder, heads for the hills and finds the love of a good bear.
At the risk of sounding both banal and boosterish, let me go so far as to say "world-class" excellent articles.
Steinbeck opts for boosterish prose throughout the letters: