bootblack


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boot·black

 (bo͞ot′blăk′)
n.
A person who cleans and polishes shoes for a living.

bootblack

(ˈbuːtˌblæk)
n
(Professions) chiefly US another word for shoeblack

boot•black

(ˈbutˌblæk)

n.
a person who shines shoes and boots for a living.
[1810–20, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bootblack - a person who polishes shoes and bootsbootblack - a person who polishes shoes and boots
unskilled person - a person who lacks technical training
Translations

bootblack

[ˈbuːtblæk] Nlimpiabotas mf inv, bolero/a m/f (Mex), embolador(a) m/f (Col)
References in classic literature ?
After that we had everything of note, the bootblack boy, the toper with bottle, the woolly rabbit that squeaks when you hold it in your mouth; they all vanished as inexplicably as the lady, but I dared not tell him my suspicions, for he suspected also and his gentle heart would have mourned had I confirmed his fears.
It is then instructed in the arts of dependence and servitude and eventually turned loose to prey upon the world as a bootblack or scullery maid.
Then he flattered himself that he looked like a true Briton, but the first time he had the mud cleaned off his shoes, the little bootblack knew that an American stood in them, and said, with a grin, "There yer har, sir.
I have known what it is to be a street-waif, a bootblack, living upon a crust of bread and sleeping in cellar stairways and under empty wagons.
hubins , bootblacks, thimble-riggers, street arabs, beggars, the blear-eyed beggars, thieves, the weakly, vagabonds, merchants, sham soldiers, goldsmiths, passed masters of pickpockets, isolated thieves.
With all the weird stuff pitchers have been known to employ to get an advantage over hitters, what could be so wrong with applying bootblack to the ball, say, so games are not prolonged or unduly affected by the sun's quirky rays?
"From Bootblack to Wolfe Scholar: Aldo Magi, the Early Years." 90-95.
In Ada, or Ardor, Cubism is bunk "bric-aBraques," a sculpture by Henry Moore resembles "a huge hideous lump of bourgeois mahogany," and avant-garde painting deflates into "progressive philistine Art, bootblack blotches, and excremental smears on canvas." For an author who so partook in modernism's zeal for involution and chance, Nabokov's jabs (though partly in jest; by his pen, too, "Proust" was an anagram for "stupor") are difficult to square.
We are now seeing the resurgence of shoe polish brands in advertising, a practise few marketers could afford when cheap Chinese bootblack flooded the Continent a decade back.
As Howie points out, the fact that the bootblack has been invisible to most commentators on the piece is itself a pointed illustration of Benjamin's theory of the phantasmagoric nature of capital, its tendency to reflect 'images of people as consumers rather than producers, keeping the class relations of production virtually invisible' (Buck-Morss, quoted in Howie/Pusca 2010, p.
When Frank returns home after losing all his money at billiards, William declares that he has found his son a job as a "bootblack" the only work "which is not monopolized by the Chinese" (105).
El amante bilingue (henceforth El amante) begins with Juan Mares's recounting of his wife Norma's act of adultery with a charnego bootblack. Devastated by Norma's infidelity, Mares sets forth on a process of self-transformation by assuming the identity of a charnego bootblack himself in order to win her back.