bootlegging


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boot·leg

 (bo͞ot′lĕg′)
v. boot·legged, boot·leg·ging, boot·legs
v.tr.
1. To make, sell, or transport (alcoholic liquor) for sale illegally.
2. To produce, distribute, or sell without permission or illegally: a clandestine outfit that bootlegs compact discs and tapes.
v.intr.
1. To engage in the bootlegging of alcoholic liquor or another product.
2. To attach a transmitter to a dish antenna, creating an uplink via which a signal is sent to a satellite without the knowledge of the satellite's owner.
3. Football To fake a hand-off, conceal the ball on the hip, and roll out in order to pass or especially to rush around the end. Used of a quarterback.
n.
1. A product, especially alcoholic liquor, that is illicitly produced, distributed, or sold.
2. The part of a boot above the instep.
3. Football A play in which the quarterback bootlegs.
adj.
Produced, sold, or transported illegally: bootleg gin; bootleg tapes.

[From a smuggler's practice of carrying liquor in the legs of boots.]

boot′leg′ger n.

bootlegging

The making, carrying, and selling of illegal goods, notably alcohol during Prohibition.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bootlegging - the act of making or transporting alcoholic liquor for sale illegallybootlegging - the act of making or transporting alcoholic liquor for sale illegally; "the Prohibition amendment made bootlegging profitable"
marketing, merchandising, selling - the exchange of goods for an agreed sum of money
2.bootlegging - the act of selling illegally or without permission; "the bootlegging of videotapes is common in Asia"
marketing, merchandising, selling - the exchange of goods for an agreed sum of money
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Moradabad (Uttar Pradesh) [India], Jun 28 (ANI): Two people were arrested in connection with running bootlegging operations in the state after a joint raid by the Excise Department and Uttar Pradesh police, which busted an illegal liquor racket here on Friday.
Summary: Police also arrested the group behind the bootlegging operation.
MPs and municipal councillors have called for a crackdown on gangs which have turned accommodations into bootlegging dens, selling alcohol, drugs and sexual enhancers.
A police spokesman said on Wednesday Senior Superintendent of Police (Operations) Najeeb-ur-Rehman Bugvi had directed police officials to ensure effective crackdown against those possessing illegal weapons, and involved in drug peddling and bootlegging activities.
Saudi authorities have continued their campaign to eliminate the broadcasting devices that are responsible of bootlegging one of the sport channels.
The Criminal Investigations Department at the Dhofar police Command has arrested three persons for bootlegging. The two were arrested while they were transferring liquor.
Binder, the author of other books on organized crime, provides a history of organized crime in Chicago from 1920 to 1933, covering the bootlegging gangs and other important rackets before and during Prohibition.
BASE SED on Matt Bondurant's trueto-life book The Wettest County to-life book The Wettest County I n The World, Lawless (Channel n The World, Lawless (Channel 4, tonight, 10pm) stars Jason 4, tonight, 10pm) stars Jason Clarke, Tom Clarke, Tom Hardy (both right) and and Shia LeBeouf as brothers running a bootlegging operation running a bootlegging operation in Depression-era in Depression-era Virginia.
WATCH IT BASE SED on Matt Bondurant's trueto-life book The Wettest County to-life book The Wettest County I n The World, Lawless (Channel n The World, Lawless (Channel 4, tonight, 10pm) stars Jason 4, tonight, 10pm) stars Jason Clarke, Tom Clarke, Tom Hardy (both right) and and Shia LeBeouf as brothers running a bootlegging operation running a bootlegging operation in Depression-era in Depression-era Virginia.
Templeton had a population of only 428, yet fostered a bootlegging empire in its own right; its illegal alcohol became so popular that it was well-known by the moniker "Templeton Rye".
American musician Prince has sued 22 of his fans for USD1 million each over allegedly bootlegging his music.
To note just a few examples: Robert Chapman's Selling the Sixties: The Pirates and Pop Music Radio (New York: Routledge, 1992) is an overview of pirate radio in England; Lee Marshall's Bootlegging: Romanticism and Copyright in the Music Industry (London.: Sage, 2005) discusses the allure of bootlegged sound recordings through the tens of romanticism; and Greg Kot's Ripped: How the Wired Generation Revolutionized the Music Industry (New York: Scribner, 2009) documents technological changes that altered the way that listeners access sound recordings, the music industry's desire to cling tightly to an outdated paradigm for distributing and selling recordings by accusing listeners of theft, as well as artists and bands who embraced digital innovations.