boots


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Related to boots: cowboy boots

boot 1

 (bo͞ot)
n.
1. A durable covering for the foot and part or much of the leg, usually made of leather, fabric, plastic, or rubber.
2. A protective covering, especially a sheath to enclose the base of a floor-mounted gear shift lever in a car or truck.
3. Chiefly British An automobile trunk.
4.
a. A kick.
b. Slang An unceremonious dismissal, as from a job. Used with the.
c. Slang A swift, pleasurable feeling; a thrill.
5. A Denver boot.
6. A marine or navy recruit in basic training.
7. Computers The process of starting or restarting a computer.
8. boots An instrument of torture, used to crush the foot and leg.
tr.v. boot·ed, boot·ing, boots
1. To put boots on.
2. To kick: booted the ball into the goal.
3. Slang To discharge unceremoniously. See Synonyms at dismiss.
4. Computers To start (a computer) by loading an operating system from a disk.
5. To disable (a vehicle) by attaching a Denver boot.
6. Baseball To misplay (a ground ball).

[Middle English bote, from Old French.]

boot 2

 (bo͞ot)
intr.v. boot·ed, boot·ing, boots
To be of help or advantage; avail.
n.
1. Chiefly Southern & Midland US See lagniappe.
2. Archaic Advantage; avail.
Idiom:
to boot
In addition; besides: The new cruise ship was not only the biggest in the world, but the fastest to boot.

[Middle English boten, to be of help, from Old English bōtian, from bōt, help; see bhad- in Indo-European roots.]

boots

(buːts)
n, pl boots
Brit (formerly) a shoeblack who cleans the guests' shoes in a hotel

boots

(buts)

n., pl. boots.
Brit. a servant, as at a hotel, who blacks or polishes shoes and boots.
[1615–25; pl. of boot1; see -s3]
Translations

boots

[buːts] NSING (Brit) → limpiabotas mf inv (de un hotel)

boots

n sing (Brit) → Hausbursche or -diener m
References in classic literature ?
He commenced dressing at top by donning his beaver hat, a very tall one, by the by, and then --still minus his trowsers -- he hunted up his boots. What under the heavens he did it for, I cannot tell, but his next movement was to crush himself --boots in hand, and hat on --under the bed; when, from sundry violent gaspings and strainings, I inferred he was hard at work booting himself; though by no law of propriety that I ever heard of, is any man required to be private when putting on his boots.
"I kin remember when her two feet was no bigger dan yer t'umb, and she weared worsted boots," moaned she.
It was in the yard of one of these inns--of no less celebrated a one than the White Hart--that a man was busily employed in brushing the dirt off a pair of boots, early on the morning succeeding the events narrated in the last chapter.
Sergeant Cuff had given the boy a leaf torn out of his pocket-book, on which was written in pencil, "Send me one of Rosanna Spearman's boots, and be quick about it."
I wanted a pair of boots at a certain town, for I had none to travel in, but those with the memorable cork soles, which were much too hot for the fiery decks of a steamboat.
Young Jerry, dress yourself, my boy, and while I clean my boots keep a eye upon your mother now and then, and if you see any signs of more flopping, give me a call.
In glass cases were some labeled fragments of boots and batons, and other suggestive relics and remembrances of casualties on Mount Blanc.
They've got a right to come up and buy drinks at the bar yonder forrard, and they take that chance to bribe somebody to keep watch on me--porter or boots or somebody.
Now you, Captain," and he turned to a thin, dirty little artillery officer who without his boots (he had given them to the canteen keeper to dry), in only his stockings, rose when they entered, smiling not altogether comfortably.
At home, Polly ran and rode, coasted and skated, jumped rope and raked hay, worked in her garden and rowed her boat; so no wonder she longed for something more lively than a daily promenade with a flock of giddy girls, who tilted along in high-heeled boots, and costumes which made Polly ashamed to be seen with some of them.
Veneering, after cogitation, thinks of Boots and Brewer.
No gentleman were admitted, so Jo played male parts to her heart's content and took immense satisfaction in a pair of russet leather boots given her by a friend, who knew a lady who knew an actor.