borage


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Related to borage: borage oil

bor·age

 (bôr′ĭj, bŏr′-)
n.
An annual bristly herb (Borago officinalis) native to the Mediterranean region, having blue or purplish star-shaped flowers, edible leaves and stems, and seeds containing oil used as a dietary supplement.

[Middle English, from Old French bourage, from Medieval Latin borāgō, probably from Arabic bū'araq, from 'abū 'araq, source of sweat (from its use as a sudorific) : 'ab, father, source; see ʔb in Semitic roots + 'araq, sweat; see ʕrq in Semitic roots.]

borage

(ˈbɒrɪdʒ; ˈbʌrɪdʒ)
n
1. (Botany) a European boraginaceous plant, Borago officinalis, with star-shaped blue flowers. The young leaves have a cucumber-like flavour and are sometimes used in salads or as seasoning
2. (Plants) any of several related plants
[C13: from Old French bourage, perhaps from Arabic abū `āraq literally: father of sweat, from its use as a diaphoretic]

bor•age

(ˈbɔr ɪdʒ, ˈbɒr-, ˈbɜr-)

n.
a plant, Borago officinalis, native to S Europe, having hairy leaves and stems.
[1250–1300; Middle English burage]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.borage - hairy blue-flowered European annual herb long used in herbal medicine and eaten raw as salad greens or cooked like spinachborage - hairy blue-flowered European annual herb long used in herbal medicine and eaten raw as salad greens or cooked like spinach
borage - an herb whose leaves are used to flavor sauces and punches; young leaves can be eaten in salads or cooked
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Borago, genus Borago - perennial herbs of the Mediterranean region
2.borage - an herb whose leaves are used to flavor sauces and punches; young leaves can be eaten in salads or cooked
herb - aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities
borage, Borago officinalis, tailwort - hairy blue-flowered European annual herb long used in herbal medicine and eaten raw as salad greens or cooked like spinach
Translations
Boretsch
boraja
kurkkuyrtti

borage

[ˈbɒrɪdʒ] Nborraja f

borage

nBorretsch m

borage

[ˈbɒrɪdʒ] nborragine f
References in periodicals archive ?
70g mixed herbs, such as basil, parsley, mint, chives, lemon balm, borage, mint, chervil, tarragon, lemon thyme and rosemary Method 1.
It is found in vegetable oils like evening primrose, borage seed etc.
2 thyme sprigs, leaves only 2 rosemary sprigs, leaves only 8 edible flowers (such as pansies, rose petals and borage) 50ml elderflower cordial 150ml elderflower liqueur 150ml gin ice 330ml can sparkling water Pop the herbs and flowers into the holes of an ice cube tray, fill with water and freeze for 23 hrs or until frozen solid.
Happy herbs Plant thyme, parsley, basil, borage and mint in a sunny border or in patio pots.
It is thought to have been responsible for the Trojan war in so far as Helen is said to have consumed borage flowers before absconding with Paris.
It was called Borage, a Mediterranean herb, though I do not know if any borage grew among Sonya's beautiful flowers.
Elemis Peptide Thousand Flower Mask, PS37, www.elemis.com Restore radiance with this mineral-rich mask containing Nordic peat and willow complex Kypwell Dynmic Rejuvenating Mask, PS49, www.kypwell.com Contains almond, borage, jojoba and avocado oils to deeply hydrate and nourish skin.
Some of the beneficial companions for tomatoes include basil, borage, chives, leaf lettuce, marigolds, nasturtiums and parsley.
EX-TOMORROW'S World presenter Judith Hann used to spend her time in a TV studio, but these days she's out in her garden, growing more than 150 culinary herbs including borage, sweet cicely and others which taste great but aren't widely available in supermarkets.
Former Tomorrow's World presenter JUDITH HANN, who now runs herb courses, shows you how X-TOMORROW'S World presenter Judith Hann used to spend her time in a TV studio, but these days she's e's out in her garden, growing more than 150 culinary herbs including borage, sweet cicely and others which taste great but aren't widely available in supermarkets.
One such herb is borage. In the home, its fuzzy green foliage and clusters of sky-blue flowers will attract many compliments.