borage


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Related to borage: borage oil

bor·age

 (bôr′ĭj, bŏr′-)
n.
An annual bristly herb (Borago officinalis) native to the Mediterranean region, having blue or purplish star-shaped flowers, edible leaves and stems, and seeds containing oil used as a dietary supplement.

[Middle English, from Old French bourage, from Medieval Latin borāgō, probably from Arabic bū'araq, from 'abū 'araq, source of sweat (from its use as a sudorific) : 'ab, father, source; see ʔb in Semitic roots + 'araq, sweat; see ʕrq in Semitic roots.]

borage

(ˈbɒrɪdʒ; ˈbʌrɪdʒ)
n
1. (Botany) a European boraginaceous plant, Borago officinalis, with star-shaped blue flowers. The young leaves have a cucumber-like flavour and are sometimes used in salads or as seasoning
2. (Plants) any of several related plants
[C13: from Old French bourage, perhaps from Arabic abū `āraq literally: father of sweat, from its use as a diaphoretic]

bor•age

(ˈbɔr ɪdʒ, ˈbɒr-, ˈbɜr-)

n.
a plant, Borago officinalis, native to S Europe, having hairy leaves and stems.
[1250–1300; Middle English burage]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.borage - hairy blue-flowered European annual herb long used in herbal medicine and eaten raw as salad greens or cooked like spinachborage - hairy blue-flowered European annual herb long used in herbal medicine and eaten raw as salad greens or cooked like spinach
borage - an herb whose leaves are used to flavor sauces and punches; young leaves can be eaten in salads or cooked
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Borago, genus Borago - perennial herbs of the Mediterranean region
2.borage - an herb whose leaves are used to flavor sauces and punches; young leaves can be eaten in salads or cooked
herb - aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities
borage, Borago officinalis, tailwort - hairy blue-flowered European annual herb long used in herbal medicine and eaten raw as salad greens or cooked like spinach
Translations
Boretsch
boraja
kurkkuyrtti

borage

[ˈbɒrɪdʒ] Nborraja f

borage

nBorretsch m

borage

[ˈbɒrɪdʒ] nborragine f
References in periodicals archive ?
As a reputed Carrier Oil Manufacturers, Aromaaz International offers an excellent quality Borage Carrier Oil to people looking for the reliable option to keep their hair, skin and health fit & flawless.
EX-TOMORROW'S World presenter Judith Hann used to spend her time in a TV studio, but these days she's out in her garden, growing more than 150 culinary herbs including borage, sweet cicely and others which taste great but aren't widely available in supermarkets.
Former Tomorrow's World presenter JUDITH HANN, who now runs herb courses, shows you how X-TOMORROW'S World presenter Judith Hann used to spend her time in a TV studio, but these days she's e's out in her garden, growing more than 150 culinary herbs including borage, sweet cicely and others which taste great but aren't widely available in supermarkets.
Borage is a beautiful plant that greenfingered gardeners soak in water to make compost tea.
And cocktail drinkers among you may have discovered the beautiful azure blooms of borage look stunning when frozen in ice cubes.
A number of studies have examined whether supplements that contain GLA (such as evening primrose oil and borage oil) are beneficial for eczema patients.
Like all members of the Borage family, it's hairy - so you might want to wear gloves if you have sensitive skin.
It belongs to the borage family, many of which have blue flowers, though its flowers are an interesting purple-blue and encased in grey calyces.
The Iranian borage (Echium amoenum) is a multi-annual plant originating from the family Boraginaceae [4].
The researchers examined various flaxseed, black currant, borage and evening primrose oils as part of its new report.
Borage or borragine is also known as starflower and used as a flavourA[degrees]ing agent and a vegetable.