borage


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Related to borage: borage oil

bor·age

 (bôr′ĭj, bŏr′-)
n.
An annual bristly herb (Borago officinalis) native to the Mediterranean region, having blue or purplish star-shaped flowers, edible leaves and stems, and seeds containing oil used as a dietary supplement.

[Middle English, from Old French bourage, from Medieval Latin borāgō, probably from Arabic bū'araq, from 'abū 'araq, source of sweat (from its use as a sudorific) : 'ab, father, source; see ʔb in Semitic roots + 'araq, sweat; see ʕrq in Semitic roots.]

borage

(ˈbɒrɪdʒ; ˈbʌrɪdʒ)
n
1. (Botany) a European boraginaceous plant, Borago officinalis, with star-shaped blue flowers. The young leaves have a cucumber-like flavour and are sometimes used in salads or as seasoning
2. (Plants) any of several related plants
[C13: from Old French bourage, perhaps from Arabic abū `āraq literally: father of sweat, from its use as a diaphoretic]

bor•age

(ˈbɔr ɪdʒ, ˈbɒr-, ˈbɜr-)

n.
a plant, Borago officinalis, native to S Europe, having hairy leaves and stems.
[1250–1300; Middle English burage]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.borage - hairy blue-flowered European annual herb long used in herbal medicine and eaten raw as salad greens or cooked like spinachborage - hairy blue-flowered European annual herb long used in herbal medicine and eaten raw as salad greens or cooked like spinach
borage - an herb whose leaves are used to flavor sauces and punches; young leaves can be eaten in salads or cooked
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Borago, genus Borago - perennial herbs of the Mediterranean region
2.borage - an herb whose leaves are used to flavor sauces and punches; young leaves can be eaten in salads or cooked
herb - aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities
borage, Borago officinalis, tailwort - hairy blue-flowered European annual herb long used in herbal medicine and eaten raw as salad greens or cooked like spinach
Translations
Boretsch
boraja
kurkkuyrtti

borage

[ˈbɒrɪdʒ] Nborraja f

borage

nBorretsch m

borage

[ˈbɒrɪdʒ] nborragine f
References in periodicals archive ?
Dishes include Roast Rib Eye Beef with Smoked Tomatoes & Kale Pesto; Snapper with Toasted Quinoa, Marjoram, Borage & Buttered Sorrel; Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes, Hazelnuts, Truffle, Labna & Sage and much more.
Like all members of the Borage family, it's hairy - so you might want to wear gloves if you have sensitive skin.
It belongs to the borage family, many of which have blue flowers, though its flowers are an interesting purple-blue and encased in grey calyces.
The Iranian borage (Echium amoenum) is a multi-annual plant originating from the family Boraginaceae [4].
As the pulmonarias pull out of the As the pulmonarias pull out of the limelight, anchusas, another borage relation, step into it.
RELATIVE NEWCOMERS: Root cuttings are a good way to increase many borage relatives, including comfreys and all the longifolia forms of pulmonaria.
The researchers examined various flaxseed, black currant, borage and evening primrose oils as part of its new report.
Borage or borragine is also known as starflower and used as a flavourA[degrees]ing agent and a vegetable.
The 13-year-old confides in his friend Sam, a woodland ranger, who in turn contacts an old schoolmate, Nat Borage, a man with an in-depth knowledge of conspiracy theories.
It is comprised of water; glycerin; a provitamin of vitamin B5; allantoin; white tea extract; blueberry extract; acai extract; at least one UVA and/or UVB screening agent; stearyl alcohol; grape seed oil; borage oil; olive oil; jojoba oil; vitamin E acetate; salicylic acid; an amino acid or a form of an amino acid; an alpha arbutin; hydrolyzed rice bran protein, oxido reductases, and/or glycine soja (soybean) protein; sodium hyaluronate; aloe or an extract from aloe; lactic acid; a dermatologically-acceptable form of silicone; one or more polyacrylamide-based emulsifying agents; vitamin A palmitate; orange oil and lemongrass oil.
In one study, 37 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were randomly assigned to receive, in double-blind fashion, borage oil (providing 1.