borderland


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bor·der·land

 (bôr′dər-lănd′)
n.
1. Land located on or near a border.
2. An indeterminate area, situation, or condition: the borderland between sleeping and waking.

borderland

(ˈbɔːdəˌlænd)
n
1. (Human Geography) land located on or near a frontier or boundary
2. an indeterminate region: the borderland between intellect and intelligence.

bor•der•land

(ˈbɔr dərˌlænd)

n.
1. land forming a border or frontier.
2. an uncertain, intermediate district, space, or condition.
[1805–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.borderland - district consisting of the area on either side of a border or boundary of a country or an area; "the Welsh marches between England and Wales"
district, territorial dominion, territory, dominion - a region marked off for administrative or other purposes

borderland

noun
The line or area separating geopolitical units:
Translations

borderland

[ˈbɔːdəlænd] Nzona f fronteriza
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to investigate how medieval rulers coped with peripheral challenges, Fokt chose Upper Lusatia for study, a region that was not only on a political and cultural periphery and borderland from the very moment it appeared in the chronicles, but also never was of central importance for historical research in any of the three countries concerned: Germany, Bohemia, and Poland.
Fleeing threats of deportation and violence in the Dominican Republic, some 3,000 Haitian-Dominican refugees have been abandoned to their fate, like so much human refuse, in squalid conditions and legal limbo in the southwest of Hispaniola's borderland.
The first part of the book, chapters one through four, establishes the Plains Metis clearly as a borderland people.
territorial expansion, whereby "the widespread practice of Indian sign language offers a compelling opportunity to reimagine Native political alignments along a shifting international borderland that remained largely opaque to Euro-American eyes in the 1820s" (84).
Dominican, DominicanAmerican, Haitian and Haitian-American writers and artists are put in dialogue with authors who were born in Europe, the rest of the Americas, Algeria, New Zealand, and Japan in order to illuminate some of the processes and histories that have woven and continue to weave the texture of the borderland and the complex web of border relations on the island.
This volume examines the relationship between archeology and modern national identities and nationalism, focusing on the Danish-German borderland.
In five parts, contributors trace the beginnings of and necessity for transnational abolitionist activism in this unique borderland, and the legal and political pressures, coupled with African Americans' irrepressible quest for freedom, that led to the growth of the Underground Railroad.
8) "The experiences of these borderland Metis communities," he continues, "therefore offer a fresh perspective on the political, economic, and environmental transformations that re-worked the Northern Plains across the nineteenth century.
Borderland on the Isthmus: Race, Culture, and the Struggle for the Canal Zone, by Michael E.
Does a frontier lying beyond the periphery of a core power become a borderland when it is incorporated into the expanding core?
The author of this study adds to a growing body of scholarship extending Southern and Midwestern history to examine the borderland existing along the Ohio River in the decades leading to the American Civil War.
Although both terms describe liminal places, and borderland allows a degree of imaginative control, borderland usually evokes political divisions, while urban fringe refers specifically to those urban-rural borderlands that are neither wholly city nor entirely country.