bork


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bork

(bɔːk)
vb (tr)
1. to incorrectly configure a device, esp a computer
2. to cause damage to
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) jocular US to disrespect or vilify, esp in order to obstruct a person's appointment to public office

bork

(bɔrk)
v.t.
to attack (a candidate or public figure) systematically, esp. in the media.
[1988, Amer.; after Judge Robert H. Bork, whose appointment to the Supreme Court was blocked in 1987 after an extensive media campaign by his opponents]
References in periodicals archive ?
What struck me in that moment, and now, is that Robert Bork had won.
In 1989, Bork was quoted as saying in regard to the Second Amendment, "Its intent was to guarantee the right of states to form militias, not individuals to bear arms." He reportedly prefaced that comment by saying, "I'm no expert on the Second Amendment."
Bork had "managed to embed the culture war" in the antitrust debate, writes Wu, and proceeded to win that war by convincing a broad swath of lawyers and judges that respectability and intellectual rigor lay on the side of tamping down antitrust fervor.
A store clerk provided Bork's rental history to Washington City Paper reporter Michael Dolan, who claimed he was researching the film preferences of a potential Supreme Court justice.
Before Kavanaugh, the closest divisions of public opinion were six points (31% in favor, 25% opposed) for Bork in 1987 and eight points (44% to 36%) for Harriet Miers in 2005.
"Fritz and I go back a ways," said Bork, another NIU Hall of Famer and 1999 inductee into the College Football Hall of Fame.
Bork routinely preached the virtues of a judiciary that's deferential to lawmakers, arguing that in the vast majority of cases, "the only course for a principled Court is to let the majority have its way."
Judge Bork said an emergency call in which a panicked Bullock described seeing a man in her home showed Corbett was a danger.
Burger King sees a lot of potential in Austria, Bork said, adding the company is focused on continuity and wants to accelerate its growth.
Marine Corps, and a highly successful stint in private practice, Bork began his teaching career at Yale Law School in 1962 as a professor of antitrust law.
But it was also a "blank slate" for her to redecorate, repaint and refashion as she saw fit, Bork said.
As for intellectual brilliance, Robert Bork's scholarship led the rationalization of antitrust law that has endured until today.