wedlock

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Related to born in wedlock: Out-of-wedlock

wed·lock

 (wĕd′lŏk′)
n.
The state of being married; matrimony.
Idiom:
out of wedlock
Of parents not legally married to each other: born out of wedlock.

[Middle English wedlocke, from Old English wedlāc : wedd, pledge + -lāc, n. suff. expressing activity.]

wedlock

(ˈwɛdlɒk)
n
1. the state of being married
2. (Law) born out of wedlock born when one's parents are not legally married
[Old English wedlāc, from wedd pledge + -lāc, suffix denoting activity, perhaps from lāc game, battle (related to Gothic laiks dance, Old Norse leikr)]

wed•lock

(ˈwɛdˌlɒk)

n.
the state of marriage; matrimony: joined in wedlock; born out of wedlock.
[before 1100; Middle English wedlok, Old English wedlāc literally, a pledging =wed pledge (see wed) + -lāc verbal n. suffix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wedlock - the state of being a married couple voluntarily joined for life (or until divorce)wedlock - the state of being a married couple voluntarily joined for life (or until divorce); "a long and happy marriage"; "God bless this union"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
marital status - the condition of being married or unmarried
bigamy - having two spouses at the same time
common-law marriage - a marriage relationship created by agreement and cohabitation rather than by ceremony
endogamy, inmarriage, intermarriage - marriage within one's own tribe or group as required by custom or law
exogamy, intermarriage - marriage to a person belonging to a tribe or group other than your own as required by custom or law
marriage of convenience - a marriage for expediency rather than love
misalliance - an unsuitable alliance (especially with regard to marriage)
monandry - the state of having only one husband at a time
monogamousness, monogamy - having only one spouse at a time
open marriage - a marriage in which each partner is free to enter into extraneous sexual relationships without guilt or jealousy from the other
cuckoldom - the state of a husband whose wife has committed adultery
polygamy - having more than one spouse at a time
sigeh - a Shiite tradition of temporary marriage permitted in Iran that allows a couple to specify the terms of their relationship; can last from a few minutes to 99 years; "sigeh legally wraps premarital sex in an Islamic cloak"

wedlock

noun marriage, matrimony, holy matrimony, married state, conjugal bond One in every four children are now born outside wedlock.

wedlock

noun
The state of being united as husband and wife:
Translations
زَواج، زَوجِيَّه
ægteskab
hjónaband
laulība

wedlock

[ˈwedlɒk] N (frm) → matrimonio m
to be born out of wedlocknacer fuera del matrimonio

wedlock

[ˈwɛdlɒk] nliens mpl du mariage
to be born out of wedlock → être né(e) hors des liens du mariage

wedlock

n (form)Ehe f; to be born out of/in wedlockunehelich/ehelich geboren sein

wedlock

[ˈwɛdlɒk] n (old) → vincolo matrimoniale

wedlock

(ˈwedlok) noun
the state of being married.
References in periodicals archive ?
Children were chattel of their fathers if born in wedlock, and chattel of their mothers if born out-of wedlock.
Prior to 1947, Canadian women who married non-British status men lost their Canadian status upon marriage; children were considered "property" of their fathers if born in wedlock, and property of their mothers if born out-of wedlock.
I contend that the North Carolina statute violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, which "prohibits a state from granting rights to one class of citizens that are denied to another class of citizens." (137) "The definition of discrimination can be reduced to the idea that one person can have something [that] another person cannot have, and the only difference between the two is a specific characteristic." (138) Children born in wedlock have an automatic right to inheritance from their paternal relatives; children born out of wedlock do not.
Courts that have interpreted the Fourteenth Amendment and parallel clauses in state constitutions have held that "legislation may discriminate among classes as long as the burden imposed on the affected class is justifiable." (141) Although the distinction between "illegitimate" and "legitimate" children does not rise to the level of strict scrutiny, the United States Supreme Court used the standard of intermediate scrutiny in Trimble and Lalli and stated that intestate statutes that discriminate between children born in wedlock and out of wedlock must bear some substantial relationship to a legitimate state interest.
which governs citizenship by descent for children born in wedlock, makes
problems: it is generally clear when a child is born in wedlock and
Under Japan's Nationality Law that determines citizenship based on bloodline, a child born in wedlock to a foreign mother and Japanese father is automatically granted Japanese nationality.
In 1971 56pc of the population were married couples and nine out of 10 children were born in wedlock, while 9pc were single parents.
Such an offspring was termed a "natural child" (filho natural) and, in certain circumstances, he or she qualified as an heir, along with children born in wedlock and other relatives so born.
Currently, children born in wedlock are registered as ''eldest son'' or ''eldest daughter'' and so on, but those born out of wedlock are registered as simply ''female'' or ''male.''