Borneo

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Related to Borneans: Dyak

Bor·ne·o

 (bôr′nē-ō′)
An island of the western Pacific Ocean in the Malay Archipelago between the Sulu and Java Seas southwest of the Philippines. It is the third-largest island in the world. The sultanate of Brunei is on the northwest coast; the rest of the island is divided between Indonesia and Malaysia.

Bor′ne·an adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Borneo

(ˈbɔːnɪˌəʊ)
n
(Placename) an island in the W Pacific, between the Sulu and Java Seas, part of the Malay Archipelago: divided into Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo), the Malaysian states of Sarawak and Sabah, and the sultanate of Brunei; mountainous and densely forested. Area: about 750 000 sq km (290 000 sq miles)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bor•ne•o

(ˈbɔr niˌoʊ)

n.
an island in the Malay Archipelago, politically divided among Indonesia, Malaysia, and Brunei. 290,000 sq. mi. (750,000 sq. km).
Bor′ne•an, adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Borneo - 3rd largest island in the world; in the western Pacific to the north of Java; largely covered by dense jungle and rain forest; part of the Malay Archipelago
East India, East Indies, Malay Archipelago - a group of islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans between Asia and Australia
Brunei, Negara Brunei Darussalam - a sultanate in northwestern Borneo; became independent of Great Britain in 1984
Indonesian Borneo, Kalimantan - the part of Indonesia on the southern side of the island of Borneo
East Malaysia - the part of Malaysia that is on the island of Borneo
North Borneo, Sabah - a region of Malaysia in northeastern Borneo
Sarawak - a region of Malaysia on northwestern Borneo
Bornean - a native or inhabitant of Borneo
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Borneo

[ˈbɔːnɪəʊ] NBorneo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Borneo

[ˈbɔːrniəʊ] nBornéo f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Borneo

nBorneo nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Borneo

[ˈbɔːnɪˌəʊ] nBorneo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
At the same instant Muda Saffir with fifty of his head-hunting Dyaks emerged from the jungle east of the camp, bent on discovering the whereabouts of the girl the Malay sought and bearing her away to his savage court far within the jungle fastness of his Bornean principality.
The success of the third goal of the C&C project is indicated by the list of authors and co-authors: no less than ten are Borneans, three are from elsewhere in Indonesia, and three from Europe.
It is surprising that Heimann, otherwise very thorough, gave so little space to Borneans' recollections of Harrisson.
The survey, completed in 1985, showed that orangutans born in the wild carry the same inversion on both copies of chromosome 2 - - an SS pair in Sumatrans, a BB pair in Borneans. Hybrids with wild-born parents carry one of each, or SB.
When the Borneans arrived, they tried to settle with but were met with resistance by the aboriginal Atis or Aetas.
The folks in tribal costumes with their faces painted with black soot depict the folkloric Barter of Panay, which tells the story of how 10 Bornean datus and their families escaped a despotic ruler in Borneo during the 13th century to settle in Panay Island.
Beginning with residual headhunting rituals among the Berawan in Sarawak (Malaysian Borneo), Metcalf illuminates current practices by successively expanding his contextual and comparative field of vision to include finally most of Borneo, making an ambitious and intricate but plausible argument for connecting headhunting rites to secondary burial which the Berawan, but not many other Bornean groups practise; at issue is the necessity to contain death.