bothy

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both·y

 (bŏth′ē)
n. pl. both·ies Scots
A hut or small cottage.

[Ultimately from Old Irish both, hut; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

bothy

(ˈbɒθɪ)
n, pl bothies
1. a cottage or hut
2. (esp in NE Scotland) a farmworker's summer quarters
3. a mountain shelter
[C18: perhaps related to booth]
Translations

bothy

n (Scot) → Schutzhütte f
References in periodicals archive ?
More than PS100,000 has been spent improving bothies across the north of Scotland.
Police this week launched an initiative to protect bothies situated in remote locations across the south of Scotland.
REVELLERS using Scotland's bothies are increasingly putting hillwalkers at risk, police say.
The Mountain Bothies Association, Scotland, Wales and northern England
Shelter Stone - The Artist and The Mountain project is a partnership between an artists' institution, The Strict Nature Reserve and The Mountain Bothies Association (MBA).
"It also impacts adversely on those who use and enjoy the bothies and who act responsibly towards them.
Two timber camping bothies, a new version of glamping accommodation that Scottish Canals are installing at various locations along the Caledonian Canal, with Laggan being the first of them.
Our schedule doesn't allow for us to linger long enough to bear witness, but we have little doubt that the President will be speaking of the great achievement of the region: how it has re-interpreted the old and established traditional values in a contemporary way--just as our bothies have illustrated to us.
Bothies are basic shelters in remote areas that would traditionally have been used by workers on an estate, Found in northern England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland, they are particularly common in the Scottish Highlands
Appeal Inspector Wenda Fabian said she accepted the development as "small scale" - it has a bunkhouse and five bothies with a maximum 30 bed spaces.
These were personal possessions that accompanied their owners on their sojourns from farm to farm, and formed, for the duration of the men's engagements, part of the furnishings of successive bothies. Where meals were provided by the farmer, the need for a meal kist did not arise.
Since its introduction in the 1870s, sheep rearing has been a profitable staple of the Patagonian economy, spawning a rich vernacular of outhouses and barns (for storing and drying sheepskins) along with shepherd's bothies, stables, kennels and estancias.