boulder


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Boul·der

 (bōl′dər)
A city of north-central Colorado northwest of Denver. It is a major Rocky Mountains resort and the seat of the University of Colorado (opened 1877).

boul·der

also bowl·der  (bōl′dər)
n.
A large rounded mass of rock lying on the surface of the ground or embedded in the soil.

[Middle English bulder, of Scandinavian origin; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

boulder

(ˈbəʊldə)
n
1. (Geological Science) a smooth rounded mass of rock that has a diameter greater than 25cm and that has been shaped by erosion and transported by ice or water from its original position
2. (Geological Science) geology a rock fragment with a diameter greater than 256 mm and thus bigger than a cobble
[C13: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Swedish dialect bullersten, from Old Swedish bulder rumbling + sten stone]
ˈbouldery adj

boul•der

(ˈboʊl dər)

n.
a detached and rounded or worn rock, esp. a large one.
[1610–20; Middle English bulderston < Scandinavian]

Boul•der

(ˈboʊl dər)

n.
a city in N Colorado. 75,990.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boulder - a large smooth mass of rock detached from its place of originboulder - a large smooth mass of rock detached from its place of origin
glacial boulder - a boulder that has been carried by a glacier to a place far distant from its place of origin
river boulder - a boulder that has been carried by a river to a place remote from its place of origin
rock, stone - a lump or mass of hard consolidated mineral matter; "he threw a rock at me"
shore boulder - a boulder found on a shore remote from its place of origin
2.Boulder - a town in north central Colorado; Rocky Mountains resort center and university town
Centennial State, Colorado, CO - a state in west central United States in the Rocky Mountains
Translations
صَخْرَه، جَلْمود
balvan
rullesten
ŝtonego
järkälelohkare
szikla: nagy szikladarab/kő
akmuoriedulys
laukakmens
balvan
kaya kütlesi/parçası

boulder

[ˈbəʊldəʳ] Ncanto m rodado

boulder

[ˈbəʊldər] ngros rocher m (généralement lisse, arrondi)

boulder

nFelsblock m, → Felsbrocken m

boulder

[ˈbəʊldəʳ] nmasso, macigno

boulder

(ˈbəuldə) noun
a large rock or stone. a boulder on the hillside.
References in classic literature ?
Six trips he made in the five hours before Basuli reached the kopje, and at the end of that time he had transported forty-eight ingots to the edge of the great boulder, carrying upon each trip a load which might well have staggered two ordinary men, yet his giant frame showed no evidence of fatigue, as he helped to raise his ebon warriors to the hill top with the rope that had been brought for the purpose.
As I topped a great boulder I saw the herd of plant men surrounding a little group of perhaps five or six green men and women of Barsoom.
After a couple of hours we passed round a huge boulder to come to a steep declivity leading down into a valley.
The spot I had chosen for my observations was the top of a large, flat boulder which rose six or eight feet above the turf.
Why not here, as well as in a feather bed, twenty years hence," he muttered, as he seated himself in the shelter of a boulder.
The girl of the golden hair and sea-blue eyes was sitting on a boulder of the headland, half-hidden by a jutting rock.
I gather the larkspur Over the hillside, Blown mid the chaos Of boulder and bellbine; Hating the tyrant Who made me an outcast, Who of his leisure Now spares me no moment: Drinking the mountain spring, Shading at noon-day Under the cypress My limbs from the sun glare.
Anne was sitting on the big gray boulder in the orchard looking at the poem of a bare, birchen bough hanging against the pale red sunset with the very perfection of grace.
Here he cast about for a comfortable seat, lighted on a big boulder under a birch by the trackside, sate down upon it with a very long, serious upper lip, and the sun now shining in upon us between two peaks, put his pocket-handkerchief over his cocked hat to shelter him.
He was still three paces, however, from his victim's side when John upon the cliff above plucked up a huge boulder, and, poising it for an instant, dropped it with fatal aim upon the slinger beneath him.
Susan had run out, swerving sharp to the left at the door, and on the edge of the slope crouched down behind a boulder.
I needed exercise, so I employed my agent in setting stranded logs and dead trees adrift, and I sat on a boulder and watched them go whirling and leaping head over heels down the boiling torrent.