bounty

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boun·ty

 (boun′tē)
n. pl. boun·ties
1. Liberality in giving.
2. Something given liberally.
3. A reward, inducement, or payment, especially one given by a government for acts deemed beneficial to the state, such as killing predatory animals, growing certain crops, starting certain industries, or enlisting for military service.

[Middle English bounte, from Old French bonte, from Latin bonitās, goodness, from bonus, good; see deu- in Indo-European roots.]

bounty

(ˈbaʊntɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. generosity in giving to others; liberality
2. a generous gift; something freely provided
3. a payment made by a government, as, formerly, to a sailor on enlisting or to a soldier after a campaign
4. any reward or premium: a bounty of 20p for every rat killed.
[C13 (in the sense: goodness): from Old French bontet, from Latin bonitās goodness, from bonus good]

Bounty

(ˈbaʊntɪ)
n
(Nautical Terms) a British naval ship commanded by Captain William Bligh, which was on a scientific voyage in 1789 between Tahiti and the West Indies when her crew mutinied

boun•ty

(ˈbaʊn ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a premium or reward, esp. one offered by a government.
2. a generous gift.
3. generosity.
[1200–50; Middle English b(o)unte < Anglo-French, Old French bonte, Old French bontet < Latin bonitātem]
boun′ty•less, adj.
syn: See bonus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bounty - payment or reward (especially from a government) for acts such as catching criminals or killing predatory animals or enlisting in the militarybounty - payment or reward (especially from a government) for acts such as catching criminals or killing predatory animals or enlisting in the military
governing, government activity, government, governance, administration - the act of governing; exercising authority; "regulations for the governing of state prisons"; "he had considerable experience of government"
reward - payment made in return for a service rendered
2.bounty - the property of copious abundancebounty - the property of copious abundance  
abundance, copiousness, teemingness - the property of a more than adequate quantity or supply; "an age of abundance"
3.bounty - generosity evidenced by a willingness to give freely
generosity, generousness - the trait of being willing to give your money or time
4.Bounty - a ship of the British navy; in 1789 part of the crew mutinied against their commander William Bligh and set him afloat in an open boat

bounty

noun (Literary)
1. generosity, charity, assistance, kindness, philanthropy, benevolence, beneficence, liberality, almsgiving, open-handedness, largesse or largess The aid organization would not allow such bounty.
2. abundance, plenty, exuberance, profusion, affluence, plenitude, copiousness, plenteousness autumn's bounty of fruits, seeds and berries
3. reward, present, grant, prize, payment, gift, compensation, bonus, premium, donation, recompense, gratuity, meed (archaic), largesse or largess They paid bounties for people to give up their weapons.

bounty

noun
A sum of money offered for a special service, such as the apprehension of a criminal:
Translations
كَرَم، جودهِبَةٌ، عَطِيَّةٌ
darštědrost
generøs gaveoverflod
palkkio
örlætivegleg gjöf
dóvanos
balvadāsnumsdevībavelte
cömertçe verilen hediyecömertlikeli açıklıkihsan

bounty

[ˈbaʊntɪ]
A. N
1. (= generosity) → generosidad f, munificencia f
2. (= reward) → recompensa f (Mil) → premio m de enganche
B. CPD bounty hunter Ncazarrecompensas mf inv

bounty

[ˈbaʊnti] n (= generosity) [person, nature] → générosité f; [season] → abondance f
(= reward) → prime fbounty hunter nchasseur m de primes

bounty

n
(= generosity)Freigebigkeit f; (of nature)reiche Fülle (geh)
(= gift)großzügige or reiche Gabe (geh)
(= reward money)Kopfgeld nt

bounty

:
bounty-fed
adj (Econ) → subventioniert
bounty hunter
nKopfgeldjäger(in) m(f)

bounty

[ˈbaʊntɪ] n (generosity) → liberalità, munificenza; (reward) → taglia

bounty

(ˈbaunti) noun
1. generosity in giving.
2. (plural ˈbounties) something given out of generosity.
References in classic literature ?
With France and with Britain we are rivals in the fisheries, and can supply their markets cheaper than they can themselves, notwithstanding any efforts to prevent it by bounties on their own or duties on foreign fish.
Attracted by the high pay and considerable bounties offered by the Gun Club, he had enlisted a choice legion of stokers, iron-founders, lime-burners, miners, brickmakers, and artisans of every trade, without distinction of color.
Why did Britain between the years and pay to her whalemen in bounties upwards of 1,000,000 pounds?
Bounties for other vulnerabilities from Kaspersky will range
Participants earned more than $130,000 in bounties.
Details on the program itself, such as rewards for bounties, are not listed in the bill.
In return for dutifully following the set guidelines, bounties that range from $150 to $1,500 per bug are up for grabs depending on the severity.
It also holds the top position for the most bounties paid.
1) In a later edition Smith used the Scottish herring fishery, whose nominal subsidies were significantly increased after 1750, as a specific example to show just how wasteful bounties were.
Whistleblower bounties of up to 15 percent of recovered amounts are also available for smaller disputes.
The SEC has been authorized to pay bounties in insider cases for 21 years, but before the Pequot settlement, bounties played an insignificant role in agency cases.
Okay, now the promoting is done, I am going to talk about how you chase down these bounties.