bowhead

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bow·head

 (bō′hĕd′)
n.
A baleen whale (Balaena mysticetus) of Arctic seas, having a large head, an arched upper jaw, and no dorsal fin.

bowhead

(ˈbəʊˌhɛd)
n
(Animals) a large-mouthed arctic whale, Balaena mysticetus, that has become rare through overfishing but is now a protected species

bow•head

(ˈboʊˌhɛd)

n.
a whalebone whale, Balaena mysticetus, of northern seas, having an enormous head and mouth.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bowhead - large-mouthed Arctic whalebowhead - large-mouthed Arctic whale    
baleen whale, whalebone whale - whale with plates of whalebone along the upper jaw for filtering plankton from the water
Balaena, genus Balaena - type genus of the Balaenidae: Greenland whales
References in classic literature ?
"Room eight-seven, Clay street, the Bowhead Lodging House, you know the place, entrance just around the corner from the Bowhead Saloon.
Currently, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) manages Native subsistence requests to hunt bowheads by issuing licenses (http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=D67BEABF-1, accessed 6 Apr.
He has studied gray whales in Baja California, watched great bowheads in Alaska and dived with humpbacks off the Hawaiian Islands.
The last time I saw bowheads was while hunting caribou and seals with Inuits around Baffin Island's mountainous fiords.
Bowheads can live to 200 thanks to their ultra-slow metabolism.
"Our study represents the first genetic analysis of bowheads across their entire range," said Elizabeth Alter, the study's lead author and now a professor at City University of New York.
Most scientists agree that the Bering Sea is the likely breeding ground for many bowheads, but we don't know exactly where the breeding grounds are.
With the help of scientists they uncover the secrets of the mammals' intimate lives, such as how they mate and hunt, and further reveal how arctic bowheads can live to be more than 200 years old.
The film shows for the first time a pair of bowheads mating.
In its annual conference May 20-24 in Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi Prefecture, the 48-member body voted down a U.S.-Russian proposal to renew the five-year quota for a total of 280 bowheads for Inuit and far-east Russian native peoples to hunt for dietary reasons.