bowshot

bow·shot

 (bō′shŏt′)
n.
The distance that an arrow can be shot.

bowshot

(ˈbəʊˌʃɒt)
n
(Archery) the distance an arrow travels from the bow
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References in classic literature ?
In the first pamphlet the battle between Don Quixote and the Biscayan was drawn to the very life, they planted in the same attitude as the history describes, their swords raised, and the one protected by his buckler, the other by his cushion, and the Biscayan's mule so true to nature that it could be seen to be a hired one a bowshot off.
The Blackfeet knew and marked him as he passed; he was within bowshot of their ambuscade; yet, much as they thirsted for his blood, they forbore to launch a shaft; sparing him for the moment that he might lead them to their prey.
"But after the Torquasians had retreated beyond bowshot, they turned upon us with their terrible rifles, and by constant popping at us made life miserable within our walls.
He was too close for a careful bowshot, but I let drive at him as he came, without taking aim.
More recently I made the world's worst (and most embarrassing) bowshot on ah antelope that I was fortunate to recover eight hours later with the assistance of my only remaining weapon, a folding pocketknife.
Busy as ants hurrying orcs were digging, digging lines of deep trenches in a huge ring, just out of bowshot from the walls; and as the trenches were made each was filled with fire, though how it was kindled or fed, by art or devilry, none could see.
According to tradition the Arash resolved a conflict about the boundaries of Persia by shooting an arrow and all the land within the bowshot became Persia.
Set up near a trail, green edge or the like that might funnel a buck for a bowshot. Some does and bucks will browse on the ridge before moving out to the crops at dusk.
Another warrior was to offer himself as bait to draw the fearsome creature within bowshot of the hidden archers.
The bodily and positional freeing of himself from the room turns into an imaginative projection of himself into what Rossetti would call "the very world" in which the hearts of Pompilia and Caponsacchi "beat or bled." The stance on the terrace becomes an "inner standing-point": Over the roof o' the lighted church I looked A bowshot to the street's end, north away Out of the Roman gate to the Roman road By the river, till I felt the Apennine.
At 8 yards, the bowshot was a "gimme." The middle of the day had coughed up yet another bruiser buck for Mathes.
Besides, the only real need for speed was to cover the deadly ground within bowshot of the Persians--a couple of hundred yards at most.