box score


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box score

n.
A printed summary of a game, as in baseball or basketball, in the form of a table listing the players and their positions and recording individual performance.

box′ score`


n.
a printed boxlike summary of a game.
[1910–15, Amer.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Examination of the box scores reveals numerous inconsistencies between a given box score and the accompanying text.
Went outside, went to the phone, called the AP and UPI, had my son read the box scores, then I went to press table and wrote a completely new story for the Inquirer.
Blaisdell's narrative is limited, as he himself admits, by a lack of primary sources (autobiography, interviews, letters, etc.) and the consequent need to depend on newspapers and box scores. Despite hopes of outdoing the journalists of Hubbell's time by gathering "more about Hubbell than they had," Blaisdell "found only what the press had reported at the time in bits and pieces" (3).
This group had a Top 2 Box score of 45% versus a Bottom 2 Box score of 32%, but even their commitment gap was negative: 19% Very Favorable versus 25% very unfavorable," Jetta says.
Fortunately for Bulls' fans, "Rose" shows up in the box score.
Meanwhile, as Washington obsesses over the political box score, the economy has been going down the toilet.
Representative of a number of tremendous Japanese players who recently have transitioned to the U.S., Suzuki leads off the box score for Seattle and often is leading the American League in batting percentage as well.
To return to the Tribune's and the Times' disparate box synopses, suppose an ardent fan from each city had examined his newspaper's box score and game account.
The box score for the index of 10 stocks last quarter was down a resounding 164.19 points, or -10.41%, to end at 1,412.52 points.
The box score for our indicator in the second three-month stanza of 1991: down 58.22 points, or 2.26 percent, before finally coming to rest at 2515.83.
Box scores of the period noted the number of hands lost (H.L.) and runs by each striker along with fielding statistics, such as the box score for the "Great Silver Ball Match" between picked nines from New York and Brooklyn on October 21, 1861.
"That data is being put in by me, you're following my scoring of the game, then any box score you see online was created by a datacaster,'' he said.