brachiopod


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bra·chi·o·pod

 (brā′kē-ə-pŏd′, brăk′ē-)
n.
Any of numerous marine invertebrates of the phylum Brachiopoda, having a shell with two valves of unequal size enclosing an armlike lophophore used for feeding, and including many extinct species commonly found as fossils. Also called lampshell.

[From New Latin Brāchiopoda, phylum name : Latin brācchium, arm; see brachium + New Latin -poda, -pod.]

brach′i·o·pod′ adj.

brachiopod

(ˈbreɪkɪəˌpɒd; ˈbræk-)
n
(Animals) any marine invertebrate animal of the phylum Brachiopoda, having a ciliated feeding organ (lophophore) and a shell consisting of dorsal and ventral valves. Also called: lamp shell See also bryozoan
[C19: from New Latin Brachiopoda; see brachium, -pod]

bra•chi•o•pod

(ˈbreɪ ki əˌpɒd, ˈbræk i-)

n.
any superficially clamlike marine animal of the phylum Brachiopoda, having unequal dorsal and ventral shells enclosing a pair of ciliated food-gathering appendages.
[1830–40; < New Latin Brachiopoda. See brachio-, -pod]

bra·chi·o·pod

(brā′kē-ə-pŏd′)
Any of various invertebrate animals that live in the ocean and resemble clams but are sedentary. Brachiopods have paired upper and lower shells attached to a stalk, and hollow tentacles covered with cilia that sweep food particles into the mouth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brachiopod - marine animal with bivalve shell having a pair of arms bearing tentacles for capturing foodbrachiopod - marine animal with bivalve shell having a pair of arms bearing tentacles for capturing food; found worldwide
invertebrate - any animal lacking a backbone or notochord; the term is not used as a scientific classification
Brachiopoda, phylum Brachiopoda - marine invertebrates that resemble mollusks
Adj.1.brachiopod - of or belonging to the phylum Brachiopoda
References in periodicals archive ?
This facies is bioclastic grainstone and consists of brachiopod shells, bryozoans, ostracods, gastropods, crinoids and mollusks (Fig.
When he took us fossil hunting near Carlops, about 20 miles from Edinburgh, we were lucky enough to find a tiny brachiopod - a shellfish-type creature that is more than 400million years old.
They are found in radiolarians, diatoms, sponges, boreal copepods, and brachiopod larvae.
Brachiopod fauna from the peri-Iberian platform system is well-known in the Late Pliensbachian-Toarcian interval.
audebarti, while the brachiopod presented higher mean concentrations of Zn and Cd (soft parts), Pb (shells) and Cu (pedicles).
In 1972, British brachiopod paleontologist Martin Rudwick penned a judicious and revelatory volume, The Meaning of Fossils: Episodes in the History of Palaeontology.
Brachiopod, Bivalve Calcareous Sandstone Facies (MF3): This facies is 4.74m thick.
The sex of each brachiopod was determined, and female gonadal development was classified into one of four gametogenic stages (Fig.
In this study, we collected 8 brachiopod species from Japan, including 5 from class Articulata, and determined their C values by flow cytometry.
Based upon brachiopod fossils, (cephalopods and condonts), the age of the Jolfa Formation has been classified as being Late Dzhulfian in terms of Permian stages in the Tethyans region (Chen et al., 2005).
We hiked upstream in an underground river, discovering mineral formations, cave walls elegantly carved by rushing water, and most exciting of all to some in our group, brachiopod fossils dating back millions of years.