brachium


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bra·chi·um

 (brā′kē-əm, brăk′ē-)
n. pl. bra·chi·a (brā′kē-ə, brăk′ē-ə)
1. The part of the upper arm or forelimb extending from the shoulder to the elbow.
2. An arm or a homologous anatomical structure, such as a flipper or wing.
3. The part of a limb or process corresponding to an arm.

[Latin brācchium, arm, from Greek brakhīōn, upper arm; see mregh-u- in Indo-European roots.]

brachium

(ˈbreɪkɪəm; ˈbræk-)
n, pl -chia (-kɪə)
1. (Anatomy) anatomy the arm, esp the upper part
2. (Zoology) a corresponding part, such as a wing, in an animal
3. (Biology) biology a branching or armlike part
[C18: New Latin, from Latin bracchium arm, from Greek brakhiōn]

bra•chi•um

(ˈbreɪ ki əm, ˈbræk i-)

n., pl. bra•chi•a (ˈbreɪ ki ə, ˈbræk i ə)
1. the part of the arm from the shoulder to the elbow.
2. the corresponding part of any limb.
3. an armlike part.
[1725–35; < New Latin; Latin brāc(c)hium arm < Greek brachíōn arm, humerus, comp. of brachýs short]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brachium - (biology) a branching or armlike part of an animal
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
ramification, branch, leg - a part of a forked or branching shape; "he broke off one of the branches"
References in periodicals archive ?
Post hec pater ejus ad quoddam bellum perrexit et viriliter pugnavit, in quo bello brachium dextrum amisit.
T2 showed a more uniform distribution in cerebral cortex and subcortical nuclei of an apparently lesser amount of Pr[P.sup.D]; T3 appeared to preferentially affect the hemispheric white matter and other subcortical regions such as the alveus, the corpus callosum, the anterior commissure, and fascicles surrounding thalamus as well as other white matter formations such as fimbria, brachium of superior colliculus, medial lemniscus, and cerebral peduncles.
We then repeated the trial with another 26 scorpions having only the brachium (first segment before the chela) painted (Control group).
The baPWV was automatically calculated by dividing the distance between the two arterial recording sites by the transit time according to the formula (L/PTT), where L represents the difference between the length from the heart to the ankle and the length from the heart to the brachium, and PTT represents the pulse transit time between the brachial and tibial arterial waveforms.
A counterincision was then made proximally over the biceps muscle in the proximal brachium (Figure 2).
Primary survey demonstrated obvious deformities of the right brachium and right thigh as well as a painful, externally rotated left lower extremity.
Force plate (N) PVF PVI Dog l Fractured 123.64 11.16 Contralateral 131.77 11.92 Dog 2 Fractured 74.66 7.94 Contralateral 89.59 13.75 Dog 3 Fractured 66.63 6.78 Contralateral 67.02 8.17 Limb circumference (mm) Brachium Antebrachium Thigh Crus Dog l 151 92 -- -- 155 89 -- -- Dog 2 -- -- 330 138 -- -- 329 137 Dog 3 -- -- 260 134 -- -- 262 136 Goniometry (degrees) Shoulder Elbow Carpus F E F E F E Dog l 54 132 23 145 42 184 55 130 20 140 35 180 Dog 2 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Dog 3 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Goniometry (degrees) Hip Stifle Hock F E F E F E Dog l -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Dog 2 38 168 42 159 38 162 32 172 41 152 38 160 Dog 3 24 175 30 165 48 165 29 175 23 168 25 169
Caption: Figure 3: Images from a 65-year-old man with subacute bilateral brachium pontis infarction.
MRI of the brain and spinal cord showed evidence of multiple foci of faint bright signal intensity involving the posterior pons and left brachium pontis (Figure 1), with superior extension extending to cerebral subcortical and deep white matter, bilateral thalami, and basal ganglia (Figure 2), and inferior extension along the spinal cord at multiple levels (Figure 3), with small punctate enhancement that aligned along fine curvilinear enhancing structures; given the typical features, the possibility of CLLIPPERS was raised by the radiologist.