bracket creep


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bracket creep

n.
A shift of personal income into a tax bracket with a higher tax rate as a result of inflation.

brack′et creep`


n.
the movement of a wage earner into a higher federal income-tax bracket as a result of wage increases intended to help offset inflation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bracket creep - a movement into a higher tax bracket as taxable income increases
income tax - a personal tax levied on annual income
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However, the IEF did not take into account the correction made for bracket creep, which benefited millions of ordinary salary workers,' it added.
The federal payroll tax hike only makes things worse and is exacerbated by other hikes--including carbon and fuel tax increases, and income tax hikes in the form of bracket creep in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, where brackets aren't indexed to consumer price inflation.
In turn, that will result in "bracket creep," in which tax filers move to a higher tax rate without seeing the same boost in their real incomes.
As a result, under the bills the income levels will not increase as quickly, potentially forcing taxpayers into higher tax brackets as their incomes increase due to inflation (a process called "bracket creep").
At the federal level, double-digit inflation pushed households into higher income-tax brackets ("bracket creep"), a problem solved only when the 1981 tax cut sensibly tied future bracket thresholds to inflation.
This injustice is called "bracket creep" where taxpayers who are not considered high earning are already pushed into high brackets, Angara warned.
The culprit behind the whopping tax bill is bracket creep, the result of inflation which would hike wages but at the same time elevates them to higher tax brackets.
In the 1980s, the narrative was the end of stagflation and middle-class tax bracket creep. In the 1990s, it was the rise of globalization and the peace dividend with the fall of the Berlin Wall.
Households were therefore pushed into higher brackets (so-called bracket creep) and paid more taxes even when their real incomes weren't rising.
One was the issue of bracket creep, whereby people start to pay higher rate, 40%, tax too soon.
A CDU proposal to cure bracket creep in income taxes, where inflating wages push workers into high tax brackets, would ultimately cost Berlin and regional governments 19bn euros over four years.