brain coral

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brain coral

n.
Any of several reef-building corals of various genera, especially Diploria, that form rounded colonies resembling the convolutions of the human brain.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

brain coral

n
(Animals) a stony coral of the genus Meandrina, in which the polyps lie in troughlike thecae resembling the convoluted surface of a human brain
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

brain′ cor`al


n.
any reef-building coral of the genera Meandrina and Diploria, having a highly convoluted surface.
[1700–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brain coral - massive reef-building coral having a convoluted and furrowed surfacebrain coral - massive reef-building coral having a convoluted and furrowed surface
madrepore, madriporian coral, stony coral - corals having calcareous skeletons aggregations of which form reefs and islands
genus Maeandra, Maeandra - brain corals
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study, which was published on Monday in ecology and evolution journal part of Nature journal, shows that removing coral predators is a common local action used by managers across the world, and that removing the corallivorous snail Coralliophila abbreviata from Caribbean brain corals before a major warming event, increased coral resilience by reducing bleaching severity resistance and post-bleaching tissue mortality (recovery).
Divers from around the world flock here to swim with massive manta rays and glide through undersea forests of brain corals, blue staghorns and orange sea whips.
Affected were Brain Corals species locally called tampulong and binagong.