branch instruction


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branch instruction

n
(Communications & Information) computing a machine-language or assembly-language instruction that causes the computer to branch to another instruction
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The compare instruction performs a comparison between two values and the result of the comparison impacts the bits of the flag register, which determines the consequent jump performed by a branch instruction. Propagation through control flow means that an erroneous jump is performed by a branch instruction.
The ICCS would broaden integrated branch instruction and allow a shorter, more elaborate and specific educational format for branch comprehensive institutional training.
When an unconditional branch instruction is encountered, no further instructions are added, and the sequence terminates.
An example is the branch instruction, which is unable to make a correct decision whether to jump or not during this instruction in the execution cycle.
Branch prediction essentially involves a guess on the likely stream direction that is to take place after a branch instruction; whenever such a guess is correct, penalty in pipeline delay is either reduced or completely avoided.
If DAACS cannot determine the value this register contained when the instruction was executed, it will ignore the branch instruction and thus fail to create a feasible path.
To the extent the compiler can schedule condition code updates early (and/or load the branch address registers early) the hardware can lookahead and fold-out resolvable branches from the instruction issue slot normally occupied by the branch instruction, and allows the instruction dispatcher to feed a continuous linear stream of instructions to the computational execution units.
To facilitate program-based methods for branch prediction, some modern architectures provide a "branch-likely" bit in each branch instruction [Alverson et al.
Thus, from the dispatcher's perspective this allows basic blocks to be connected without ever seeing the branch instruction or the fetch penalty.
These instructions can sometimes be used in sequences of code that would traditionally require a branch instruction. For example, obtaining the result of the comparison of a value with zero is traditionally performed through use of a conditional branch in conjunction with two possible assignments, depending on the result of the comparison.
It also will be capable of simultaneously executing a fixed point, a floating point, and a branch instruction. As has been stated several times, optimizing compilers will be essential to exploit such machines.