brash

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brash 1

 (brăsh)
adj. brash·er, brash·est
1. Presumptuously forward; impudent: "She couldn't imagine anyone being happy with this loud, brash, opinionated businessman" (Anne Bartlett). See Synonyms at shameless.
2. Hasty or unrestrained without regard for consequences: "his brash, ill-considered attacks on members of his own party" (Susan Dunn).
3. Arresting, pronounced, or ostentatious: brash plaids.
4. Brittle: brash timbers.

[Possibly imitative (influenced by rash) or from brash, attack.]

brash′ly adv.
brash′ness n.

brash 2

 (brăsh)
n.
A mass or pile of rubble, refuse, or fragments, as of stone, brush, or ice.

[Perhaps an alteration of French brèche, breach in a wall, from Italian breccia; see breccia.]

brash

(bræʃ)
adj
1. tastelessly or offensively loud, showy, or bold
2. hasty; rash
3. impudent
[C19: perhaps influenced by rash1]
ˈbrashly adv
ˈbrashness n

brash

(bræʃ)
n
loose rubbish, such as broken rock, hedge clippings, etc; debris
[C18: of unknown origin]

brash

(bræʃ)
n
(Pathology) pathol another name for heartburn
[C16: perhaps of imitative origin]

brash

(bræʃ)

adj. -er, -est,
n. adj.
1. impertinent; impudent; tactless: a brash young man.
2. hasty; rash; impetuous.
3. energetic or spirited, esp. in an irreverent way; zesty: a brash new musical.
4. (esp. of wood) brittle.
n.
5. a mass of loose fragments, as of ice.
[1400–50; late Middle English brass(c)he a slap, crash]
brash′ly, adv.
brash′ness, n.

brash

- A euphemism for vomit.
See also related terms for vomit.

Brash

 a mass of fragments or debris; a sudden outburst of rain.
Examples: brash of bitter waters, 1856; of hedge clippings; of ice, 1837; of rain, 1849; of twigs; of stone; of wooing, 1724.

brash

A mass of rubble or stone fragments.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.brash - offensively bold; "a brash newcomer disputed the age-old rules for admission to the club"; "a nervy thing to say"
forward - used of temperament or behavior; lacking restraint or modesty; "a forward child badly in need of discipline"

brash

brash

adjective
Translations
وقح، صفيق، متهوّر
drzýneomalený
selvhævdende
frakkur
bezkaunīgs

brash

[bræʃ] ADJ (brasher (compar) (brashest (superl)))
1. (= over-confident) → presuntuoso; (= rash) → impetuoso
2. (= crude) [colour] → chillón; [taste] → vulgar

brash

[ˈbræʃ] adjeffronté(e)

brash

adj (+er)nassforsch, dreist; (= tasteless) colour etclaut, aufdringlich

brash

[bræʃ] adj (impudent) → sfrontato/a, sfacciato/a

brash

(brӕʃ) adjective
cheekily self-confident and impolite. a brash young man.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brasher has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area.
While bigger and brasher than its TV equivalent, it retains its distinctive charm.
Traci Brasher, recovery division director for FEMA Region 6
-- With violent weather plowing through the Southeast, the kitchen windows exploded at Richard Brasher's home in eastern Alabama.
He enlisted the aid of his training companions and friends Chris Chataway and Chris Brasher, top athletes in their own right, as pacemakers.
Its panelists were Ben Hopkins (George Washington University) Razia Sultana (Quaid-e-Azam University) and Ryan Brasher (Forman Christian College) who shed light on Afghan history and mind set.
Royal Punjab rode on Matias Vial Perez ( 3), William Brasher ( 4), and Dhruvpal Godara's ( 1) impressive performances to notch victory.
London Marathon director Hugh Brasher said: "We are doing absolutely everything we can to have clean racing."
subsidiary has signed a definitive agreement to acquire eight auctions owned by the Brasher family, the company said.
The Welshman helped create the annual event - which was run for the first time in 1981 - along with founding race director Chris Brasher, designing the course.
The firm, which includes the Berghaus and Brasher brands, have announced results for last year in which the loss for the financial year narrow considerably, from [pounds sterling]8m to [pounds sterling]4.9m.
BORN MIKE Figgis, English film director, 1948 ROBIN Cook, Labour politician, 1946, above BRIAN Jones, Rolling Stones guitarist, 1942 DIED CHRIS Brasher, English athlete, 2003 DERMOT Morgan, Irish actor, 1998, above MIKE Smith, English pop musician, 2008