brave new world


Also found in: Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

brave new world

n.
1. A world or realm of radically transformed existence, especially one in which technological progress has both positive and negative results.
2. A field, endeavor, or aspect of life that seems new and often intimidating because one is experiencing it for the first time: "You're on your own. Welcome to the brave new world of do-it-yourself travel" (Susan Stellin).

[Originally a phrase written by William Shakespeare in The Tempest (c.1610): How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world / That has such people in't! (later used by Aldous Huxley as the title of his novel Brave New World (1932), a depiction of future dystopia in which humans are separated into rigid castes and controlled through technological and chemical means ).]
References in periodicals archive ?
An antiutopia that begins with John leaving the reservation for the brave new world better fits Huxley's account of how Brave New World "started out"--"as a parody of H.
It seems that Aldous Huxley in his Brave New World has a clearer view of the long-term threat to human freedom.
Homosexual activists, radical feminists, abortion zealots and haters of Christianity have banded together to bring down the old order and substitute their own version of the Brave New World.
The brave new world is all about transferring information inexpensively and reliably to other systems that can decide about service, replenishment, and market demand.
Many insurance companies anticipated that nimble footing would be necessary in this brave new world, and they took steps to become more agile.
BRITISH athletes will be forced to enter a brave new world at the Birmingham Grand Prix meeting on Sunday.
They disagree on the function and purpose of art, the criteria by which art should be evaluated, what constitutes the universal, and whether true cultural equity has a place in the yet-to-be-articulated brave new world of American theater.
Clifford Stoll's The Cuckoo's Egg, Michelle Slatella and Joshua Quittner's Masters of Destruction, and Cyberpunk, which I co-authored with Katie Hafner, all explore the brave new world of young men obsessed with powerful machines and computer networks.
It has, nonetheless, grand expectations - specifically, less duplicative paperwork, less cost-shifting from payer-to-payer, and less fragmented care in general (see also "Long-Term Care's Brave New World," Nursing Homes, November/December 1996).
In this brave new world, we surviving cybernauts are expected to work more quickly, more efficiently, and more productively than ever.
A scientific dispatch from the brave new world of reproductive technologies contains encouraging news about family life.
Earlier Miltonists have tried to explain the Digression, with its disillusioned portrayal of the new republic, as simply stemming from a temporary fit of pique when the brave new world promised by the execution of Charles I did not immediately materialize.