braw

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Related to brawer: brawler, drawer, Ubar, Brewers

braw

 (brô)
adj. braw·er, braw·est Scots
1. Fine; splendid.
2. Dressed in a fine or showy manner.

[Scots, variant of brave.]

braw

(brɔː; brɑː)
adj
fine or excellent, esp in appearance or dress
pl n
best clothes
[C16: Scottish variant of brave]
ˈbrawly adv

braw

(brɔ, brɑ)

adj. Chiefly Scot.
1. excellent.
2. finely dressed.
[1555–65; variant of brave]
braw′ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.braw - brightly colored and showy; "girls decked out in brave new dresses"; "brave banners flying"; "`braw' is a Scottish word"; "a dress a bit too gay for her years"; "birds with gay plumage"
colourful, colorful - striking in variety and interest; "a colorful period of history"; "a colorful character"; "colorful language"
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts

braw

adjective
Scots. Having pleasant desirable qualities:
Scots: bonny.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Simmons RA, Cosgrove SC, Romney MC, Plumb JD, Brawer RO, Gonzalez ET, et al.
Catalona, W.J., Partin, A.W., Slawin, K.M., Brawer, M.K., Flanigan, R.C., Patel A, Richie JP, deKernion JB, Walsh PC, Scardino PT, Lange PH, Subong, E.N., Parson, R.E., Gasior, G.H., Loveland, K.G., Southwick, P.C.
The term HGPIN, introduced by Bostwick and Brawer, (3) encompassed all intraductal neoplastic proliferations of the prostate, including what are considered aggressive lesions, such as intraductal carcinoma of the prostate (including ACP).
Private trunk show from Etro with suits and shirts, Analog Shift with vintage watches, Lois Sassoon with beautiful cufflinks, Nicholas Brawer with antique card and huge binoculars, food served by Certe, and single malt scotches and single-barrel bourbons poured.
Previous research has provided support for the role of PCBH in improving access to mental health care, including engagement in mental health services and the referral process to specialty mental health, although this evidence is from nonrandomized trial studies (Brawer et al., 2011; Brawer, Martielli, Pye, Manwaring, & Tierney, 2010; Pomerantz, Cole, Watts, & Weeks, 2008; Watts, Shiner, Pomerantz, Stender, & Weeks, 2007).
Recently there has been a growing amount of research focused on developmental writing in community colleges (Bailey, 2009; Cohen & Brawer, 2003; Edgecombe, Cormier, Bickerstaff & Barragan, 2013).
Still, it is increasingly clear that most psychology training programs do not devote adequate attention to religious and spiritual diversity (Brawer, Handal, Fabricatore, Roberts, & Wajda-Johnston, 2002; Hage, 2006; Hathaway, Scott, & Garver, 2004; Schafer, Handal, & Brawer, 2011; Schulte, Skinner, & Claiborn, 2002; Vogel, McMinn, Peterson, & Gathercoal, 2013).
By Catherine Coleman Brawer and Kathleen Murphy Skolnik Andrea Monfried Editions, 2014
Focus groups have been used to study many areas of interest to medical-surgical nursing, such as factors that influence implementation of a screening tool for delirium (Swan, Becker, Brawer, & Sciamanna, 2011) and patients', caregivers', and providers' perceived strategies for diabetes care (Akohoue, Patel, Adkerson, & Rothman, 2015).