brawl

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brawl

 (brôl)
n.
1. A noisy quarrel or fight.
2. Slang A loud party.
intr.v. brawled, brawl·ing, brawls
To quarrel or fight noisily.

[Middle English braul, from braullen, to quarrel.]

brawl′er n.
brawl′ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: brawl, donnybrook, fracas, fray1, free-for-all, melee, scrap2, scrape, scuffle1
These nouns denote a noisy, disorderly, and often violent quarrel or fight: a barroom brawl; a vicious legal donnybrook; a fracas among prison inmates; eager for the fray; a free-for-all in the schoolyard; police plunging into the melee; a scrap between opposing players; a scrape that took place at the mall; a scuffle that broke out in the courtroom.

brawl

(brɔːl)
n
1. a loud disagreement or fight
2. slang US an uproarious party
vb (intr)
3. to quarrel or fight noisily; squabble
4. (esp of water) to flow noisily
[C14: probably related to Dutch brallen to boast, behave aggressively]
ˈbrawler n
ˈbrawling n, adj

brawl

(brɔːl)
n
(Dancing) a dance: the English version of the branle

brawl

(brɔl)
n.
1. a noisy fight or quarrel, esp. in a public place.
2. a bubbling or roaring noise; clamor.
3. Slang. a large, noisy party.
v.i.
4. to fight or quarrel angrily and noisily; wrangle.
5. to make a bubbling or roaring noise, as water flowing over a rocky bed.
[1350–1400; Middle English: to raise a clamor]
brawl′er, n.
brawl′y, adj.

brawl


Past participle: brawled
Gerund: brawling

Imperative
brawl
brawl
Present
I brawl
you brawl
he/she/it brawls
we brawl
you brawl
they brawl
Preterite
I brawled
you brawled
he/she/it brawled
we brawled
you brawled
they brawled
Present Continuous
I am brawling
you are brawling
he/she/it is brawling
we are brawling
you are brawling
they are brawling
Present Perfect
I have brawled
you have brawled
he/she/it has brawled
we have brawled
you have brawled
they have brawled
Past Continuous
I was brawling
you were brawling
he/she/it was brawling
we were brawling
you were brawling
they were brawling
Past Perfect
I had brawled
you had brawled
he/she/it had brawled
we had brawled
you had brawled
they had brawled
Future
I will brawl
you will brawl
he/she/it will brawl
we will brawl
you will brawl
they will brawl
Future Perfect
I will have brawled
you will have brawled
he/she/it will have brawled
we will have brawled
you will have brawled
they will have brawled
Future Continuous
I will be brawling
you will be brawling
he/she/it will be brawling
we will be brawling
you will be brawling
they will be brawling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been brawling
you have been brawling
he/she/it has been brawling
we have been brawling
you have been brawling
they have been brawling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been brawling
you will have been brawling
he/she/it will have been brawling
we will have been brawling
you will have been brawling
they will have been brawling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been brawling
you had been brawling
he/she/it had been brawling
we had been brawling
you had been brawling
they had been brawling
Conditional
I would brawl
you would brawl
he/she/it would brawl
we would brawl
you would brawl
they would brawl
Past Conditional
I would have brawled
you would have brawled
he/she/it would have brawled
we would have brawled
you would have brawled
they would have brawled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brawl - an uproarious partybrawl - an uproarious party      
party - an occasion on which people can assemble for social interaction and entertainment; "he planned a party to celebrate Bastille Day"
2.brawl - a noisy fight in a crowd
fighting, combat, fight, scrap - the act of fighting; any contest or struggle; "a fight broke out at the hockey game"; "there was fighting in the streets"; "the unhappy couple got into a terrible scrap"
Verb1.brawl - to quarrel noisily, angrily or disruptively; "The bar keeper threw them out, but they continued to wrangle on down the street"
altercate, argufy, quarrel, scrap, dispute - have a disagreement over something; "We quarreled over the question as to who discovered America"; "These two fellows are always scrapping over something"

brawl

noun
1. fight, battle, row (informal), clash, disorder, scrap (informal), fray, squabble, wrangle, skirmish, scuffle, punch-up (Brit. informal), free-for-all (informal), fracas, altercation, rumpus, broil, tumult, affray (Law), shindig (informal), donnybrook, ruckus (informal), scrimmage, shindy (informal), bagarre (French), melee or mêlée He had been in a drunken street brawl.
verb
1. fight, battle, scrap (informal), wrestle, wrangle, tussle, scuffle, go at it hammer and tongs, fight like Kilkenny cats, altercate Gangs of youths brawled in the street

brawl

noun
A quarrel, fight, or disturbance marked by very noisy, disorderly, and often violent behavior:
Informal: fracas.
Slang: rumble.
verb
To quarrel noisily:
Translations
شغب، شجاريتشاجر بضجيج، يتعارك
rvačkarvát se
skænderislagsmålslås
civakodiklármás veszekedés
áflogslást
kelti skandaląmuštismuštynės
rīkot tračusskandalētiesskandālstracis
arbedegürültülü patırtılı kavga etmekhırgüryumruk yumruğa kavga

brawl

[brɔːl]
A. Npelea f, reyerta f
B. VIpelear, pegarse

brawl

[ˈbrɔːl]
n [drunken] → rixe f, bagarre f
vise bagarrer

brawl

visich schlagen
nSchlägerei f

brawl

[brɔːl]
1. nrissa
2. viazzuffarsi

brawl

(broːl) noun
a noisy quarrel or physical fight. The police were called out to a brawl in the street.
verb
to fight noisily.
References in classic literature ?
I tried to imagine what would happen when the master should discover that it was I who had been fighting him; and what would happen if they jailed us together in the general apartment for brawlers and petty law-breakers, as was the custom; and what might --
This jail was a Noah's ark of the city's crime--there were murderers, "hold-up men" and burglars, embezzlers, counterfeiters and forgers, bigamists, "shoplifters," "confidence men," petty thieves and pickpockets, gamblers and procurers, brawlers, beggars, tramps and drunkards; they were black and white, old and young, Americans and natives of every nation under the sun.
And could you count on fifty resolute men, good, unemployed, but active souls, brawlers, capable of bringing down the walls of the Palais Royal by crying, `Down with Mazarin,' as fell those at Jericho?
How is it, Planchet, that an intelligent man like you should take any heed of a set of brawlers who call themselves Rumps and Barebones.
Bertrade crossed the room and leaned against a massive oak table, blackened by age and hard usage to the color of the beams above, dented and nicked by the pounding of huge drinking horns and heavy swords when wild and lusty brawlers had been moved to applause by the lay of some wandering minstrel, or the sterner call of their mighty chieftains for the oath of fealty.
Clatter of hoofs, clinking of weapons, shouts from the drunken brawlers, and high laughter of women, they all rose up, like the mist from a marsh, out of the crowded streets of the dim-lit city.
It was not that the wind swept all the brawlers into places of shelter, as it had swept the hail still lingering in heaps wherever there was refuge for it; but that it seemed as if the streets were absorbed by the sky, and the night were all in the air.
Rostov went on ahead to do what was asked, and to his great surprise learned that Dolokhov the brawler, Dolokhov the bully, lived in Moscow with an old mother and a hunchback sister, and was the most affectionate of sons and brothers.
She believed him to be heartless, selfish, and misguided, but she knew that he was not the loud, coarse, sensual, and ignorant brawler most of her mother's gossips supposed him to be.
Any drunken brawler trying to make his way into the house, would have alarmed a quiet soul like her.
The man is but a very honest knave Full of fine phrases for life's merchandise, Selling most dear what he must hold most cheap, A windy brawler in a world of words.
Observing this, and that the young gentleman was nearly of his own age and had in nothing the appearance of an habitual brawler, Nicholas, impelled by such feelings as will influence young men sometimes, felt a very strong disposition to side with the weaker party, and so thrust himself at once into the centre of the group, and in a more emphatic tone, perhaps, than circumstances might seem to warrant, demanded what all that noise was about.