break-in


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break-in

(brāk′ĭn′)
n.
1. A forcible entry, as into a building or room, for an illegal purpose, especially theft.
2. An initial period of employment or operation during which the performance of a person or thing may be evaluated and adjusted.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

break′-in`



n.
1. an illegal forcible entry into a home, office, etc.
2. a period of using or running something new, as an automobile, until normal operating conditions have been reached.
[1855–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.break-in - trespassing for an unlawful purposebreak-in - trespassing for an unlawful purpose; illegal entrance into premises with criminal intent
burglary - entering a building unlawfully with intent to commit a felony or to steal valuable property
home invasion - burglary of a dwelling while the residents are at home
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

break-in

noun burglary, robbery, breaking and entering The break-in had occurred just before midnight.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

break-in

noun
The act of entering a building or room with the intent to commit theft:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

break-in

[ˈbreɪkˌɪn] Nrobo m (con allanamiento de morada)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

break-in

nEinbruch m; we’ve had a break-inbei uns ist eingebrochen worden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

break-in

[ˈbreɪkˌɪn] nirruzione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

break

(breik) past tense broke (brouk) : past participle brəken (ˈbroukən) verb
1. to divide into two or more parts (by force).
2. (usually with off/away) to separate (a part) from the whole (by force).
3. to make or become unusable.
4. to go against, or not act according to (the law etc). He broke his appointment at the last minute.
5. to do better than (a sporting etc record).
6. to interrupt. She broke her journey in London.
7. to put an end to. He broke the silence.
8. to make or become known. They gently broke the news of his death to his wife.
9. (of a boy's voice) to fall in pitch.
10. to soften the effect of (a fall, the force of the wind etc).
11. to begin. The storm broke before they reached shelter.
noun
1. a pause. a break in the conversation.
2. a change. a break in the weather.
3. an opening.
4. a chance or piece of (good or bad) luck. This is your big break.
ˈbreakable adjective
(negative unbreakable) likely to break. breakable toys.
noun
(usually in plural) something likely to break.
ˈbreakage (-kidʒ) noun
the act of breaking, or its result(s).
ˈbreaker noun
a (large) wave which breaks on rocks or the beach.
ˈbreakdown noun
1. (often nervous breakdown) a mental collapse.
2. a mechanical failure causing a stop. The car has had another breakdown. See also break down.
break-inbreak in(to)ˈbreakneck adjective
(usually of speed) dangerous. He drove at breakneck speed.
breakoutbreak outˈbreakthrough noun
a sudden solution of a problem leading to further advances, especially in science.
ˈbreakwater noun
a barrier to break the force of the waves.
break away
to escape from control. The dog broke away from its owner.
break down
1. to use force on (a door etc) to cause it to open.
2. to stop working properly. My car has broken down.
3. to fail. The talks have broken down.
4. to be overcome with emotion. She broke down and wept.
break in(to)
1. to enter (a house etc) by force or unexpectedly (noun ˈbreak-in. The Smiths have had two break-ins recently).
2. to interrupt (someone's conversation etc).
break loose
to escape from control. The dog has broken loose.
break off
to stop. She broke off in the middle of a sentence.
break out
1. to appear or happen suddenly. War has broken out.
2. to escape (from prison, restrictions etc). A prisoner has broken out (noun ˈbreakout).
break out in
to (suddenly) become covered in a rash, in sweat etc. I'm allergic to strawberries. They make me break out in a rash.
break the ice
to overcome the first shyness etc. Let's break the ice by inviting our new neighbours for a meal.
break up
1. to divide, separate or break into pieces. He broke up the old furniture and burnt it; John and Mary broke up (= separated from each other) last week.
2. to finish or end. The meeting broke up at 4.40.
make a break for it
to make an (attempt to) escape. When the guard is not looking, make a break for it.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

break-in

اقْتِحام vloupání indbrud Einbruch διάρρηξη robo con allanamiento de morada murto cambriolage provala irruzione 押し入ること 침입 inbraak innbrudd włamanie arrombamento вторгаться inbrott การบุกรุกเข้าไป hırsızlık sự đột nhập 闯入
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
Cops are also investigating a break-in in the town's High Street which happened between Thursday, February 28 and Saturday, March 2.
Eventually Halfpenny, of Hoel Hermas, Penlan, Swansea, pleaded guilty to six house burglaries, one count of handling stolen goods - tools stolen from a break-in in Gorseinon were found in his vehicle but police could not tie him to the actual burglary - and the theft of a fishing reel from a Swansea shop when he appeared in the dock at Swansea Crown Court.
As they were being reported detectives built up a picture in the break-ins, plotting the locations of break-in, and analysing the pattern and the burglar's way of working.
A seasoned criminal was arrested for house break-in hours after he had attended a court proceeding for a similar crime on Monday.
San Francisco's car break-in epidemic took a rather disturbing turn over the weekend when a man smashed into a car at a parking structure and allegedly tossed a Chihuahua to its death from the seventh floor of the structure.
This column previously reported on 33-year-old ex-NFL player Stanley Wilson II, who was shot by a homeowner during an attempted break-in in Portland, Oregon.
Detectives investigating the break-in were told about a Facebook page where people buy and sell items, and stolen items have appeared on the page.
He was finally captured speeding from the scene of a break-in when he snatched keys to two Minis and a Mercedes in Februa r y.
The unusual tactic of sleeping at the store seems to be effective; on the first night the store owners spent inside the store, there was another attempted break-in through the shop's boarded windows.
Scrawled on the wall of one break-in site were these words: "I was fired unjustly."
"Nothing is a guarantee, but we see quite a difference in break-in rates between homes with and without alarms.
An article in The New York Times suggests that the BBC-TV series was inspired, in part, by a provocative theory about what was really behind the Watergate break-in, presented in 1991 by independent journalists Len Colodny and Robert Gettlin in their best-selling book, Silent Coup (and originally explored by Jim Hougan in his maverick 1984 account, Secret Agenda).